Organization of Insect Societies: From Genome to Sociocomplexity

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Jürgen Gadau, Jennifer Fewell
Harvard University Press, 2009 - Science - 617 pages
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In this landmark volume, an international group of scientists has synthesized their collective expertise and insight into a newly unified vision of insect societies and what they can reveal about how sociality has arisen as an evolutionary strategy.

J rgen Gadau and Jennifer Fewell have assembled leading researchers from the fields of molecular biology, evolutionary genetics, neurophysiology, behavioral ecology, and evolutionary theory to reexamine the question of sociality in insects. Recent advances in social complexity theory and the sequencing of the honeybee genome ensure that this book will be valued by anyone working on sociality in insects. At the same time, the theoretical ideas presented will be of broad-ranging significance to those interested in social evolution and complex systems.

 

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Contents

ONE The Evolution of Social Insect Mating Systems
3
THREE Aging of Social Insects
51
FIVE Control of Termite Caste Differentiation
105
and the Importance of Group Benefits
128
SEVEN The Evolution of Communal Behavior
148
PART TWO Communication
171
NINE Adaptations in the Olfactory System
195
TEN Fertility Signaling as a General Mechanism
220
FIFTEEN Sensory Thresholds Learning and
335
SEVENTEEN Social Brains and BehaviorPast and Present
377
EIGHTEEN Plasticity in the Circadian Clock and
402
PART FOUR Theoretical Perspectives on Social Organization
433
TWENTY Positive Feedback Convergent Collective Patterns
460
TWE NTYO N E Division of Labor in the Context of Complexity
483
Decision Making
503
Cohesion
572

Tw E LV E Convergent Evolution of Food Recruitment
266
FOURTEEN Behavioral Genetics in Social Insects
315
Acknowledgments
609
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About the author (2009)

JÃ1⁄4rgen Gadau is Assistant Professor of Life Sciences, Arizona State University.

He was born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1929. He is currently Pellegrino University Research Professor & Honorary Curator in Entomology of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard. He is on the Board of Directors of the Nature Conservancy, Conservation International & the American Museum of Natural History. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts.

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