Acts: A Handbook on the Greek Text

Front Cover
Baylor University Press, 2003 - Religion - 558 pages
While the commentary tradition has, with some notable exceptions, shifted away from philology to take up questions of the social values, rhetorical conventions, and narrative strategies, this volume provides the textual, philological, and grammatical essentials to any act of interpretation. By working through this systematically, readers will not only gain a firmer grasp of the peculiar shape of Acts' grammar, but given Acts' length and complexity, they will also become better equipped to approach the other New Testament documents with increased confidence, particularly other narrative literature.
 

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User Review  - MarthaJeanne - LibraryThing

This book is NOT a commentary. It is a guide to the Greek grammar. Most words are parsed, and there are discussions on things that might be unclear. If you have never had any Greek it will be ... Read full review

Contents

114
1
1216
89
17
106
1722
122
4453
139
913
152
119a
168
3243
184
1015
328
111
343
17
358
1120
363
16
382
16
400
2640
413
2229
432

18
191
3443
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1926
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1825
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2641
257
17
271
15
285
3035
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1624
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1215
445
19
458
112
472
123
487
2432
502
2126
519
710
535
Bibliography
549
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Martin M. Culy is Associate Professor of New Testament at Briercrest Biblical Seminary. Culy earned an M.A. in Linguistics from the University of North Dakota, an M.Div. from Grace Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. from Baylor University.

Mikeal Parsons is Professor of Religion at Baylor University. Parsons earned his Ph.D. from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and is the author of The Departure of Jesus in Luke-Acts (1987); Rethinking the Unity of Luke and Acts (1993); and, with Heidi J. Hornick, Illuminating Luke: The Infancy Narrative in Italian Renaissance Painting (2003).

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