An Account of the Arctic Regions: With a History and Description of the Northern Whale-fishery, Volume 2

Front Cover
A. Constable & Company, 1820 - Arctic regions
Nineteenth century classic on whaling, geography and natural history of northern waters. Appendices include meteorological tables; a chronological list of voyages, 861-1819; list of plants found in Spitsbergen; Acts of Parliament regarding whaling; dimensions of whaling ships; etc.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 237 - Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet: All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field; The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.
Page 503 - That if any Action or Suit shall be commenced against any Person or Persons for...
Page 364 - ... weapon in his grasp, harpooned the whale on which he stood; and, by means of the harpoon and the line, which he never abandoned, he steadied himself firmly upon the fish, notwithstanding his hazardous situation, and regardless of a considerable wound that he received in his leg, in his fall along with the fragments of the boat. All the efforts of the other boats to approach the whale, and deliver the harpooner, were futile. The captain, not seeing any other method of saving his...
Page 244 - Immediately that it reappears, the assisting boats make for the place with their utmost speed, and as they reach it, each harpooner plunges his harpoon into its back, to the amount of three, four, or more, according to the size of the whale and the nature of the situation. Most frequently, however...
Page 379 - States, shall be reported to the collector, or other chief officer of the customs at the port of...
Page 278 - ... the one in a good state of equipment, now made an attack upon the whale. One of the harpooners made a blunder; the fish saw the boat, took the alarm, and again fled. I now supposed it would be seen no more; nevertheless, we chased nearly a mile in the direction I imagined it had taken, and placed the boats, to the best of my judgment, in the most advantageous situations. In this case we were extremely fortunate. The fish rose near one of the boats, and was immediately harpooned. In a few minutes...
Page 366 - ... closely together, that two harpoons were struck at the same moment. The fish descended a few fathoms in the direction of another of the boats, which was on the advance, rose accidentally beneath it, struck it with its head, and threw the boat, men, and apparatus, about fifteen feet into the air. It was inverted by the stroke, and fell into the water with its keel upwards. All the...
Page 499 - Blubber, the Produce of Fish or Creatures living in the Sea, taken and caught wholly by His Majesty's Subjects...
Page 493 - An Act for more effectually discovering the longitude at sea, and encouraging attempts to find a northern passage between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and to approach the North Pole.
Page 422 - The advantages of oil gas, when compared with coal gas, are claimed by these gentlemen to be the following : The material from which it is produced containing no sulphur or other matter by which the gas is contaminated, there are no objections to its use on account of the suffocating smell in close rooms. It does no injury- to furniture, books, plate, pictures, paint, &c.

Bibliographic information