Constructing the Navajo Capital: Landscape, Power, and Representation at Window Rock

Front Cover
ProQuest, 2008 - 453 pages
0 Reviews
This dissertation considers the physical and spatial ordering of buildings and people---the landscape---to follow political and social agendas. In this study, I demonstrate how Window Rock, a multi-million-dollar project of the Public Works Administration (PWA), was used as the centerpiece for OIA Commissioner John Collier's "Indian New Deal," focusing on the ways in which architectural styles, spatial relationships throughout the site, and construction technologies were used to establish cultural hierarchies and reinforce discrimination against Navajos in their own homeland, despite other attempts by that administration to promote cultural pluralism. I contend that the design of Window Rock did not reflect the values or concerns of most Dine at the time, but instead represented the "Indianness" of the users as imagined by the OIA and its architects working in New York City. Through analysis of these buildings' placement throughout the site and the "traditional" or "indigenous" iconography within them, I reveal how the built environment of Window Rock was intended to obscure the power struggle between Collier's OIA, the newly-formed Navajo Tribal Council, and Dine living throughout the reservation, as well as the manner in which many Dine resisted spatial control.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Fantasy and Federal Indian Policy Contextualizing Window Rock
13
Committees Surveillance and Resistance Planning Window Rock 7 9
79
AUTHORS BIOGRAPHY 453
80
Indigenous by Design Constructing Window Rock
130
Hogans and Houses Inhabiting Window Rock
182
Murals Models and Modemity Representing Window Rock
265
Playhouse Palace and People Refashioning Window Rock
362
REFERENCES
392
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information