Substance of the speech of the Right Honourable George Canning, in the House of Commons, on Wednesday the 30th of April, 1823, on Mr. Macdonald's motion respecting the negotiations, at Verona, Paris, and Madrid: With an appendix, containing papers presented to both houses of Parliament

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Hatchard and son, 1823 - History - 91 pages
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Page 17 - Or Shall I bend low and in a bondman's key, With bated breath and whispering humbleness, Say this ; ' Fair sir, you spit on me on Wednesday last ; You spurn'd me such a day ; another time You call'd me dog ; and for these courtesies I'll lend you thus much moneys
Page xc - It never was, however, intended as an Union for the Government of the World, or for the Superintendence of the Internal Affairs of other States.
Page 74 - If ever it shall happen that the Kings of Spain and France, either the present or the future, that both of them together, or either of them separately, shall make war, or give occasion to suspect that they intend to make war upon the kingdom of Portugal, either on the continent of Europe, or...
Page 80 - Member in this debate, that there is a contest going on in the world, between the spirit of unlimited monarchy, and the spirit of unlimited democracy. Between these two spirits, it may be said, that strife is either openly in action, or covertly at work, throughout the greater portion of Europe.
Page xlii - Majesty and the King of France, and the interest which the latter naturally feels for the welfare of the former, will occasion a perpetual irritation between the two Countries, so long as the situation of 'the King in Spain is not what it ought to be ; which it may be expected will, sooner or later, occasion War, and the invasion of the weaker Country. Thus, then, those Spaniards who really desire the peace and...
Page 11 - Why, plainly that His Majesty would not concur in such a determination, even though a difference with his allies, even though the dissolution of the alliance should be the consequence of his refusal. The answer, therefore, was exactly adapted to the question. This specimen of the bathos, this instance of perfection in the art of sinking, as it has been described to be, had its effect; and the Congress separated without determining in favour of any joint operation of a hostile character against Spain....
Page xc - In this Alliance, as in all other human Arrangements, nothing is more likely to impair, or even to destroy its real utility, than any attempt to push its duties and its obligations beyond the Sphere which its original conception and understood Principles will warrant.
Page lxxxviii - This important subject having been referred to ar.d considered by the Duke of Wellington, his Memorandum accompanies this Minute. — His Grace does not hesitate, upon his intimate experience of Spanish affairs, to pronounce that the Spanish Nation is of all the European People, that which will least brook any interference from abroad...
Page 14 - Sir, that, whatever might grow__apt pf a separate conflict between Spain and, .France, (though matter for grave consideration) was less to be dreaded, than that all the Great Powers of the Continent should have been arrayed together against Spain ;— -and that although the first object, in point of importance, indeed, was to keep the Peace altogether, — to prevent any War against Spain,— /the first, in point of time, was to prevent a general War ;/-to change the question from a question between...
Page lvii - Even by the mode in which the demand was made by France, that part of the Spanish Government or Nation, which might be willing to undertake those ameliorations of the present Constitution of Spain without which It is alleged to be unsafe to her neighbours, has been placed in a situation of great difficulty. Is it not plain, that the...

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