Tales of chivalry; or, Perils by flood and field. [the parts retaining the wrappers. Vol. 1 wanting the frontisp., index, and pt. 1-10, vol. 2 wanting the prelims., pt. 22-26, and all after pt. 41].

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Page 127 - So the people went forth, and brought them, and made themselves booths, every one upon the roof of his house, and in their courts, and in the courts of the house of God, and in the street of the water gate, and in the street of the gate of Ephraim.
Page 361 - That deck'd heroic Albion's elder day; To mark the mouldering halls of Barons bold, And the rough castle, cast in giant mould ; With Gothic manners Gothic arts explore, And...
Page 256 - that made your wife a prisoner last fall ; — we put out her eyes ; — we tore out her tongue; we treated her like a dog. Forty of our young warriors " The chieftain became incensed the moment his wife's name was mentioned : he seized his gun, and, before the last sentence was ended, a ball from it passed through the brave fellow's heart, and terminated his frightful sufferings.
Page 145 - Glittering in golden coats, like images ; As full of spirit as the month of May, And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer ; Wanton as youthful goats, wild as young bulls.
Page 256 - They then commenced cutting the flesh from about the nails, which they pulled out, and next separated the fingers from the hand joint by joint. During the performance of these cruelties the wretched captive never winced, and instead of suing for mercy, he added fresh stimulants to their barbarous ingenuity by the most irritating reproaches, part of which our interpreter translated as follows : — " My heart is strong. — You do not hurt me. — You can't hurt me. — You are fools. — You do not...
Page 85 - ... my hair, and fixed my eyes sternly and boldly upon his face. I saw that he knew me instantly, for his countenance turned as pale as ashes with surprise and hatred : he started up, placing his hand instinctively upon his sword-hilt, and glaring at me with a look so deadly, that I thought every moment he would strike his sword into my heart. He said in a kind of whisper: 'Hardress Fitzgerald!' 'Yes,' said I boldly, for the excitement of the scene had effectually stirred my blood, 'Hardress Fitzgerald...
Page 116 - Monkton had long known Zacharias, and, always inclined to a serious turn of mind, he had lately endeavoured to derive consolation from the doctrines of that enthusiast. ' On hearing from Zacharias, for the saint had no false notions of delicacy, that he was going to bring into the pale of matrimony a lamb which had almost fallen a prey to the same wolf that had invaded his own fold, Monkton expressed so warm an interest, and so earnest a desire to see the reclaimed one, that Zacharias had. invited...
Page 361 - And fretted shrines with hoary trophies hung, Her dark illumination wide she flung, With new solemnity, the nooks profound, The caves of death, and the dim arches frown'd.
Page 256 - Having been informed that they were about putting one of their prisoners to death, I went to their camp to witness the spectacle. The man was tied to a tree, after which they heated an old barrel of a gun until it became red hot, with which they burned him on the legs, thighs, neck, cheeks and belly. They then commenced cutting the flesh from about the nails, which they pulled out, and next separated the fingers from the hand joint by joint. During the performance of these cruelties the wretched...
Page 85 - Unbuckle your pack,' exclaimed the corporal; 'unbuckle your pack, fellow, and shew your goods to the captain — here where you are.' I proceeded to present my merchandise to the loving contemplation of the officers, who thronged around me with a strong light from an opposite window. As I continued to traffic with these gentlemen, I observed with no small anxiety the eyes of Captain Oliver frequently fixed upon me with a kind of dubious inquiring gaze. 'I think, my honest fellow,' he said at last,...

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