Quasars, Redshifts and Controversies

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 29, 1988 - Science - 208 pages
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For twenty years, the author has contested the 'establishment' view of quasars as the most distant objects in the universe. In this book, Arp presents the original observations and fundamental data on quasars and galaxies, and explains why he has concluded that: far from being the most distant objects in the universe, quasars are associated in space with relatively nearby galaxies; quasars' enormous redshifts do not arise from the expansion of the universe, but rather are intrinsic properties of the quasars themselves; many galaxies show redshift anomalies related to quasars' redshifts; quasars and galaxies have an origin far different from that assumed in the 'standard' big-bang model of the universe; many astronomers, despite the accumulation of compelling evidence, defend what Arp believes is a fundamentally incorrect assumption about cosmic objects.
 

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tells a lot about space

Contents

Introduction
1
Distances of Quasars
7
The Battle Over Statistics
17
Galaxies Visibly Connected to Quasars
31
Certain Galaxies with Many Quasars
47
Distribution of Quasars in Space
63
Galaxies with Excess Redshift
81
Small Excess Redshifts the Local Group
107
Correcting Intrinsic Redshifts and Identifying
115
Ejection from Galaxies
133
The Sociology of the Controversy
165
Interpretations
173
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