Modern mural decoration

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G. Newnes, ltd., 1902 - Interior decoration - 186 pages
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Page 50 - Gothic period from the beginning of the twelfth century to the end of the fifteenth century.
Page xxvi - If the classic masterpieces of any school or period are analysed it will be found that their greatness in each instance is in exact proportion to the extent of their decorative quality. The more closely they approach to the idea of technical completeness the more indisputable is their -right to be regarded as the standards" by which all other works of Art must be measured.
Page xxx - Angelo's greatest achievements were architectural carvings and frescoes painted on walls and ceilings ; Raphael's fame rests chiefly upon the paintings with which he ornamented the palaces and churches of his native land, and a host of the more famous Italians earned in the same way their right to be remembered.
Page xxv - Subject, sentimentality, dramatic effect, are not artistic essentials, but externals which have been added to Art with the idea of strengthening its hold upon the public mind. They are so many concessions to the popular craving for actuality, to that desire for the visible representation of things imagined which is one of the commonest yearnings of mankind. The average...
Page 37 - ... and the plaster an impervious stratum which serves as a protective against damp and chemical action, and reduces the risk of the painting peeling away from its base. Before this invention was perfected decorations painted on canvas had frequently been stretched on WAI.I.
Page xxiv - But there is much to be said against this petty view of the functions of decoration. Because it has a history it is not necessarily bound up with the past, and because it is applicable to other things than gallery pictures it is not a legitimate...
Page xviii - ... a smaller strain upon his intelligence. That he has any right to attention as a serious worker endowed with special abilities and capable of doing great things in Art, or that the profession he follows requires more than FRESCO.
Page xxix - Their accomplishment makes them significant, although the meaning of the incidents they illustrate has been forgotten ; and this significance no change of fashion or alteration in the popular taste can ever destroy. It is the one link by which all schools and periods are inseparably connected ; and it is immutable.
Page xviii - Each one fights for his own creed and condemns the rest as heretics and unbelievers simply because they do not accept his definition of what is legitimate. The pedant adopts a particular direction and keeps steadily to one track, blind to the fact that there lie on each side of him...
Page xvii - It is at the same time the oldest and the newest of the Arts, and the most susceptible of adaptation to suit the aesthetic necessities of any particular period.

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