Report on the Economic Resources of the West Indies

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1898 - West Indies, British - 165 pages
 

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Page 141 - Committees for each county, to receive and distribute the allotments destined for them," and, according as sufficient numbers were prepared for propagation, the Chairmen of the County Committes were apprised and their respective proportions delivered and distributed," by which means," it is quaintly remarked, " the public has derived all the advantages to be expected from these establishments.
Page 150 - In the aggregate these small patches produced bananas sufficient to fill all the first ships engaged in the trade. The fruit trade in Jamaica is now the means of circulating nearly 500,000 annually amongst all classes of the community, and this large sum is immediately available in establishing other and more permanent industries.
Page 140 - Jamaica, 1793, we gather that the breadfruit trees* (introduced in 1788) " were upwards of 11 feet high, with leaves 36 inches long, and the success in cultivating them has exceeded the most sanguine expectations ; the cinnamon tree is become very common, and mangoes are in such plenty as to be planted in the negro grounds. There are, also, several bearing trees of the jack or bastard breadfruit and we have one nutmeg plant.
Page 140 - East in Liguanea (Gordon Town) which, on the death of the founder, became the property of his nephew, Mr. EH East, " who with great generosity offered it to the Assembly of Jamaica for the use of the public at their own price." Mr. Bryan Edwards, in the History of the British West Indies, remarks that " the Assembly of Jamaica, co-operating with the benevolent intentions of His Majesty (to introduce valuable exotics and productions of the most distant regions to the West Indies) purchased in 1792-93...
Page 158 - They are to devote themselves in a systematic manner to the work of introducing, propagating and distributing all the promising economic plants of the tropics. They are to initiate the experimental cultivation of new or little known plants, and assist in the efforts made in the larger colonies to secure improved varieties of the sugar cane. They are to act as centres for diffusing accurate information, and as training institutions for the practical teaching of tropical agriculture, also as the headquarters...
Page 138 - It is a striking fact that with the exception of pimento — ' that child of nature ' — and a few others of comparatively little value, most of the staple products of the island are derived from exotics or plants introduced from other parts of the globe. While on this subject it will be of interest to notice the simple, accidental, or more often direct influences by means of which valuable seeds and plants have been introduced into the island, the mere mention of the names of which is sufficient...
Page 143 - ... afterwards reduced to 200, was placed in the hands of the members of St. Thomas-in-the-East, Portland and St. David, by whom it appears to have been administered down to the year 1852, when the garden was transferred to the Board of Directors of the Bath of St. Thomas the Apostle. Nathaniel Wilson was appointed Curator of the Garden in 1847, and devoted many years, often labouring under great discouragements, in maintaining and improving the garden and introducing new plants. His yearly reports...
Page 138 - It is a striking fact that with the exception of pimento — ' that child of nature ' — and a few others of comparatively little value, most of the staple products of the island are derived from exotics or plants introduced from other parts of the globe.
Page 142 - As a result of this proposal Mr. James Macfayden was selected and approved of as a Botanist and arrived in the island in 1826. At the same time it was felt that the Botanic Garden at Bath was too distant from Kingston and the seat of government to answer the intention proposed, and (a) Bryan Edwards
Page 140 - The genip was brought to Jamaica from Surinam by one Guaf, a Jew. The ginger is a native of the East Indies, introduced to Jamaica by a Spaniard, Francisco de Mendiza. The locust tree and blimbing were brought to Jamaica from the South Mas in His Majesty's ship Providence in the year 1793.