A short treatise on the game of whist. By a gentleman [E. Hoyle]. Repr

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Page 41 - ... one great suit ; suppose ace, king, and four small ones, and that you have queen, ten, nine, and a very small one of that suit ; when your partner plays the ace, you are to play the nine ; when he plays the king, you are to play the ten ; by which means you see, in the third round, you make your queen, and having a small one remaining, you do not obstruct your partner's great suit : whereas if you had kept your queen and ten, and the knave had fallen from the adversaries, you had lost two tricks...
Page 58 - ... he plays to your strong suit, and upon your having the lead, play the nine of trumps, which puts it in your partner's power to be almost certain of winning the queen if he lies behind it. The foregoing case shews, that turning up of an ace against you may be made less beneficial to your adversaries.
Page 40 - Knave and five small cards in his strong suit ; you having the lead are to play your Queen, and when you play again you are to play your Ten ; and suppose him to have the long trump, by this method he makes four tricks in that suit; but should you play a small...
Page 28 - Suppose you have Ace, King, Queen, and one small trump, , with a sequence from the King of five in another suit, with four other cards of no value. Begin with the Queen of trumps, and pursue the lead with the Ace, which demonstrates to your partner that you have the King ; and as it would be bad play to...
Page 44 - ... of play, your partner may suppose you to have a queen and ten remaining, especially if you have a second lead, and that you do not proceed to your queen. The knave being turned up as before, and that you have ace, queen, and ten, by playing your queen, it answers the like purpose of the former rule. If the queen is turned up on your right-hand, and that you have ace, king, and knave, by playing your king it answers the like purpose of the former rule.
Page 42 - ... of the same; your partner leads the ace; in that case play your ten, and in the second your king: this method is to prevent a possibility of obstructing your partner's great suit. Suppose your partner has ace, king, and four small cards in his great suit, and that you have queen, ten, and a small card, in that suit; when he plays his ace. do you play your ten, and when he plays his king, you play your queen; by which method of play you only risk one trick to get four. Now suppose you have five...
Page 1 - Whist lately dispersed among a few Hands at a Guinea Price," and further, that the author of it " has fram'd an Artificial Memory which takes not off your Attention from your Game ; and, if required, he is ready to communicate it upon Payment of one Guinea. And also, He will explain any Cases in the Book, upon Payment of one Guinea more.
Page 50 - ... highest, lead that suit, because it is an equal wager that your partner has a better card in that suit than the last player ; and if the ace of the first mentioned suit lies behind you, which is an equal wager it should so happen, in case your partner has it not ; in this case, on your adversaries leading this suit, you probably make two tricks in it by this method of play. Suppose in the course of play it appears to you ^that your partner and you have four or five trumps remaining, when your...

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