Golf and the American Country Club

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University of Illinois Press, 2001 - Social Science - 214 pages
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In this entertaining cultural history, Moss explores the circumstances that led to the establishment of the country club as an American social institution and its inextricable connection to the ancient, imported game of golf. Moss traces the evolution of country clubs from informal groups of golf-playing friends to "country estates" in the suburbs and eventually into public and private daily-fee courses, corporate country clubs, and gated golfing communities. The book shows how these developments reflect shifts in American values and attitudes toward health and sport, as well as changing social dynamics.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Golf and the Early Clubs
20
Golf Takes Root
43
Golf the Country Club and the American Family
60
From Simple to Complex
77
The Golden Age
102
An Endangered Species
138
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