I, Roger Williams

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W. W. Norton & Company, Sep 1, 2002 - Fiction - 320 pages
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In this beautiful and feelingly written book, Mary Lee Settle tells the story of Roger Williams: the most compelling figure in colonial America. Plucked from obscurity to clerk for the celebrated English jurist Sir Edward Coke, Williams had a ringside seat on the brutal politics of Jacobean London. He was witness to the pomp of the Star Chamber; the burning of a dissenter; and the humiliation of his master by King James and the royal favorite, the dangerously beautiful Buckingham. Haunted by ambition and love for a woman above his station, he fled to New England, where repression and conformity wore different clothes. In Settle's terrific account, the little known history of Williams emerges in layers, detailing the turbulent, dedicated life of a man committed to individuality and political freedom.
 

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Contents

I
9
II
24
III
34
IV
45
V
56
VI
68
VII
75
VIII
92
XVI
186
XVII
198
XVIII
207
XIX
215
XX
221
XXI
232
XXII
241
XXIII
250

IX
107
X
114
XI
127
XII
137
XIII
152
XIV
164
XV
174
XXIV
259
XXV
270
XXVI
282
XXVII
292
XVIII
300
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About the author (2002)

Mary Lee Settle won the National Book Award for her novel Blood Ties and was the founder of the PEN/Faulkner Prize. She died in 2005.

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