Great Cities in America: Their Problems and Their Government

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Macmillan, 1910 - Cities and towns - 426 pages
 

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Contents

can cities PAGE 1 2 3 4 6 7 10 9 The great cities in their relation to municipal democracy 12 10 Great cities in their relation to national leadership 13...
14
WASHINGTON 12 The unique position of the nations capital city
16
How the city was established
20
Forms of municipal organization during the period of selfgovernment 18021871
23
The era of Alexander R Shepherd
27
Congress as a city legislature
29
The commissioners of the District of Columbia
30
The judicial system of the District of Columbia
32
Taxation assessment revenues expenditures and debt
33
Methods of paying for local improvements
37
Police fire and sanitary administration
38
PAGE
43
Alleys tenements and shanties
44
The public schools in Washington
48
Streets parks and plans for improvement
51
Sewerage water supply and other public utilities
56
A national opportunity
60
CHAPTER III
67
The citys early charters
69
Guaranties and inhibitions of the state constitution
75
The control of the city by the state legislature
82
State administrative control in New York
83
The charter of Greater New York
86
The five boroughs
88
The borough presidents
90
Local improvements
92
The shadow of a city council 94
94
The commission form of government under another name
96
The granting of franchises
98
Rapid transit franchises
101
The executive departments
106
The mayor and his duties
107
The powers and functions of the comptroller
109
The corporation counsel
110
The police department
112
The department of water supply gas and electricity
118
The streetcleaning department
120
Control of the citys parks
122
The department of bridges
124
Docks and ferries
129
Public charities and subsidies to private charities
135
The citys penal institutions
138
Activities of the board of health 139 39
139
Tenement house supervision
144
The fire service
150
The citys schools
154
The public libraries
158
The citys judiciary
161
The assessment of property for taxation
164
Wealth debt the sinking funds and the tax rate
169
The army of the civil service
175
Reports of official work
177
The future of New York
179
CHICAGO 63 The newest of the worlds great cities
182
The citys early charters
184
The relation of the city to the state
187
The relation of the city to other governmental bodies
190
The city council
194
Municipal ownership and the citys public utilities
227
Chicagos terminal facilities
237
The citys struggle for a new charter
240
The character and power of the people of Chicago
242
CHAPTER V
244
Philadelphias official claims to respectability
246
What is the matter with Philadelphia?
249
A typical reform movement
254
The gas works
257
The revolt of John Weaver
259
The aftermath of the revolution
262
The street railway settlement
263
The water works another candidate for private operation
269
Philadelphias harbor 273 89 Public health and charities
275
The public schools
279
The constitutional status of the city
286
Councils
287
The mayor
290
Organization of the city administration
291
Assessment taxes income expenditures and debt
301
An illuminating contrast
305
SAINT LOUIS
308
The discovery of the city of St Louis 98 Constitutional home rule
312
The municipal assembly
316
The mayor and the city administration
318
The St Louis Board of Education
324
Public utilities in St Louis
327
The citys finances
331
The Civic League of St Louis
333
Billboard advertising in St Louis
337
Working for a new charter 308 32 316 318 324 327 331 333 337
341
CHAPTER VII
346
Control of the city by the state
349
State control of public utilities in Boston
351
no Metropolitan district commissions
357
1ll Municipal departments administered by state ap pointees
361
Charter legislation prior to 1909
367
Public schools school buildings and the public library
369
Public baths gymnasia and convenience stations
372
Rapid transit in Boston
373
The department of statistics
375
The finances of the city
376
The spoils system in Boston culminating in the first Fitzgerald administration 331
381
Nonpartisan elections secured
388
The council under the new charter 39
390
A new experiment in concentrated responsibility
391
Contracts appropriations and debt
392
The administrative departments
394
The finance commission
396
The problems of Bostons future
400
CHAPTER VIII
402
Artificial checks upon city growth
406
The artificial stimulation of city growth
408
The relation of great cities to concentration of power
410
The relation of great cities to democracy
412
346
417
349
419
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Page 81 - of the constitution, which provides that "appointments and promotions in the civil service of the state and of all the civil divisions thereof, including cities and villages, shall be made according to merit and fitness to be ascertained so far as practicable by examinations which, so far as practicable, shall be competitive.
Page 75 - to provide for the organization of cities and incorporated villages and to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, borrowing money, contracting debts, and loaning their credit so as to prevent abuses in assessments and in contracting debt by such municipal corporations.
Page 81 - no law shall authorize the construction or operation of a street railroad except upon the condition that the consent ... of the local authorities having the control of that portion of the street or highway upon which it is proposed to construct or operate
Page 22 - of the government for protection in the exercise of their duty might bring on the national councils an imputation of awe or influence equally dishonorable to the government and dissatisfactory to the other members of the Confederacy. This consideration has the more weight as the gradual accumulation of public improvements at the stationary residence of the
Page 81 - civil divisions thereof, including cities and villages, shall be made according to merit and fitness to be ascertained so far as practicable by examinations which, so far as practicable, shall be competitive.
Page 81 - of the local authorities having the control of that portion of the street or highway upon which it is proposed to construct or operate such railroad, be first obtained.
Page 141 - to do and order, and cause to be done, such acts and make such expenditures (beyond those duly estimated for or provided) for the preservation of the public health (though not herein elsewhere or otherwise authorized) as it may in good faith declare the public safety and health to demand, and the mayor shall in writing approve.
Page 149 - lives and safety of the occupants ; buildings without adequate water supply — the list might be added to almost indefinitely. The cleansing of the Augean stables was a small task compared to the cleansing of New York's 82,000 tenement houses, occupied by nearly three millions of people, representing every nationality and every degree in the social scale.
Page 97 - The mayor, the comptroller, and the president of the board of aldermen have three votes each. The presidents of the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn have two votes each, and the presidents of The
Page ii - ESSAYS IN THE MONETARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. By CJ Bullock. FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIOLOGY. By EA Ross. GREAT CITIES IN AMERICA. Their Problems and their Government. By DF Wilcox. GOVERNMENT IN SWITZERLAND. By JM Vincent. HISTORY OF POLITICAL PARTIES IN THE UNITED STATES. By J. Macy.

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