The Ideal Theory of Berkeley, and the Real World: Free Thoughts on Berkeley, Idealism, and Metaphysics

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Hamilton, Adams, and Company, 1865 - Idealism - 191 pages
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Page 40 - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
Page 40 - It is indeed an opinion strangely prevailing amongst men, that houses, mountains, rivers, and in a word all sensible objects, have an existence, natural or real, distinct from their being perceived by the understanding.
Page 34 - Being in company with a gentleman who thought fit to maintain Dr. Berkeley's ingenious philosophy, that nothing exists but as perceived by some mind; when the gentleman was going away, Johnson said to him, ' Pray, sir, don't leave us ; for we may perhaps forget to think of you, and then you will cease to exist.
Page 39 - But, besides all that endless variety of ideas or objects of knowledge, there is likewise Something which knows or perceives them; and exercises divers operations, as willing, imagining, remembering, about them. This perceiving, active being is what I call mind, spirit, soul, or myself. By which words I do not denote any one of my ideas, but a thing entirely distinct from them, wherein they exist, or, which is the same thing, whereby they are perceived; for the existence of an idea consists in being...
Page 41 - Now for an idea to exist in an unperceiving thing is a manifest contradiction; for to have an idea...
Page 12 - ... and veal-pie with plums, his inextinguishable thirst for tea, his trick of touching the posts as he walked, his mysterious practice of treasuring up scraps of orange-peel, his morning slumbers, his midnight disputations, his contortions, his mutterings, his gruntings, his puffings, his vigorous, acute and ready eloquence, his sarcastic wit, his vehemence, his insolence, his fits of tempestuous rage, his queer inmates, old Mr. Levett and blind Mrs. Williams, the cat Hodge and the negro Frank,...
Page 79 - Such qualities, which in truth are nothing in the objects themselves, but powers to produce various sensations in us by their primary qualities...
Page 34 - After we came out of the church, we stood talking for some time together of Bishop Berkeley's ingenious sophistry to prove the non-existence of matter, and that every thing in the universe is merely ideal. I observed, that though we are satisfied his doctrine is not true, it is impossible to refute it. I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty force against a large stone, till he rebounded from it,
Page 12 - Everything about him, his coat, his wig, his figure, his face, his scrofula, his St. Vitus's dance, his rolling walk, his blinking eye, .the outward signs which too clearly marked his approbation of his dinner, his insatiable appetite for fish-sauce and...
Page 49 - To this my answer is, that if the word substance be taken in the vulgar sense, for a combination of sensible qualities, such as extension, solidity, weight, and the like — this we cannot be accused of taking away; but if it be taken in a philosophic sense, for the support of accidents or qualities without the mind — then indeed I acknowledge that we take it away, if one may be said to take away that which never had any existence, not even in the imagination.

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