The History of the Conquest of Mexico by the Spaniards ...: Tr. Into English from the Original Spanish of Don Antonio de Solis ...

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J. Osborn, 1738 - Mexico
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Page 306 - ... prife, and nominating Cortez for commander. That he " could only have an action at law for the money expended " out of his own eflate to equip the armament fent upon " this expedition, and not for any of the effects belonging " to the king in his government. That the nomination of " Cortez afforded him no pretence, either to the glory or " profit of the expedition, as he not only granted that com" miffion without the authority of the minifters of the royal " audience, whofe orders he fhould have...
Page 385 - ... the Indians feigned to be in some disorder, that they might entice the Spaniards to the most dangerous part of -the precipice; which they had no sooner effected, than they returned with most horrible cries, letting fall from the top such a shower of stones, and entire rocks, .as barred up the way, after having borne down every thing it met with.
Page 49 - While thefe preparations were making, the Monks of St. Geronimo, who prefided over the royal audience at St. Domingo, and whofe...
Page 460 - Commander in Chief of all the Brigantines, with Orders to furround the Bay at a Diftance, and to have a watchful Eye upon whatever Motion the Enemy fhould happen to make.
Page 414 - ... pipes, made of trees hollowed, supported by an aqueduct of lime and stone, and the enemy had cast up some trenches to cover the avenue to it. But the two captains marched out of Tacuba with most of their troops, and though they met with a very obstinate resistance, they drove the enemy from their post, and broke the pipes and aqueduct in two or three places, and the water took its natural course into the lake.
Page 162 - They told him aloud, that he was no longer their King; . . . giving him the opprobrious Names of pusilanimous, effeminate Coward, an abject Prisoner, and Slave to his Enemies: Their injurious Language was drown'd by loud and repeated Shouts; and he endeavoured, by the Motions both of his Head and his Hands, to be heard, when the Multitude began to advance, and let fly their Arrows against him 10 The spasmodic succession of "Names...
Page 429 - Spaniards had filled up, that they might fall upon them with their whole force, when they ftiould be obliged to retire. This ftratagem not fucceeding to their expectation, they made perpetual fallies in the night, and kept the confederates in continual alarm, with intention to attack them with all their ftrength when Stratagem they were fpent with fatigue. But the fcheme which moft rftfy...
Page 444 - Guatiawzin ufed every artifice to improve it, by weaken*1n' ing the enemy, and infpiring his own people with confidence. He fpread a report that Cortez was killed in the late action, he fent the heads of the facrificed Spaniards to all the neighbouring towns, that thefe proofs of his victory might bring back thofe who had deferted him ; and he afferted with the...
Page 338 - Mexico, refolved to advance with Part of his Forces to the City of Iztapalapa...

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