The Prose Edda, Volume 5

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American-Scandinavian Foundation, 1916 - Mythology, Norse - 266 pages
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User Review  - Brenda - Goodreads

I'm actually reading the Translation (Kindle Version) 124 pgs Read full review

Contents

I
ix
II
3
III
11

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Page 19 - Ymir ; she licked rime-stones that were salt, and the first day there came at even, out of the stones, a man's hair, the second day a man's head, the third day all the man was there. He is named Turi ; he was fair of face, great and mighty ; he gat a son named Bor, who took to him Besla, daughter of Bolthorn, the giant, and they had three sons, Odin, Vili, and Ve.
Page 65 - I am in wrath and wrestle with me." "I see no one here," said Utgard-Loki, looking at the men sitting on the benches, "who would not think it beneath him to wrestle with thee; let somebody, however, call hither that old crone, my nurse Elli, and let Thor wrestle with her if he will. She has thrown to the ground many a man not less strong than this Thor is.
Page 43 - This was made from six things: the noise a cat makes when it moves, the beard of a woman, the roots of a mountain, the sinews of a bear, the breath of a fish, and the spittle of a bird.
Page 268 - Price $4.00 There has always been a peculiar fascination for the student of American history in that chapter of it which deals with the pre-Columbian discovery of this continent. . . . To sweep away the cobwebs of error is no small task, but Professor Hovgaard's book, with its painstaking following of the scientific method, should go a long way toward its completion. . . . Professor Hovgaard has made the best complete exposition up to date of the voyages of the Norsemen to America.
Page 267 - HENRY GODDARD LEACH, Secretary of the Foundation SCANDINAVIAN CLASSICS I. Comedies by Holberg : Jeppe of the Hill, 'The Political Tinker, Erasmus Montanus Translated from the Danish by OSCAR JAMES CAMPBELL, JR., and FREDERIC SCHENCK, with an Introduction by OSCAR JAMES CAMPBELL, JR. 1914.
Page 74 - but down and north lieth Hel-way.' "Then Hermodr rode on till he came to Hel-gate; he dismounted from his steed and made his girths fast, mounted and pricked him with his spurs; and the steed leaped so hard over the gate that he came nowise near to it. Then Hermodr rode home to...
Page 63 - Thjalfi appears to me to run this course well, but I do not believe of him now that he will win the game. But it will be made manifest presently, when they run the third heat.' Then they began the heat; but when Hugi had come to the end of the course and turned back, Thjalfi had not yet reached mid-course. Then all said that that game had been proven. "Next, Utgarda-Loki asked Thor what feats there were which he might desire to show before them : such great tales as men have made of his mighty works....
Page 42 - Jotunheim, and were aware of the prophecies that much woe and misfortune would thence come to n them, and considering that much evil might be looked for from them on their mother's side, and still more on their father's, Alfather sent some of the gods to take the children and bring them to him. When they came to him he threw the serpent into the deep sea which surrounds all lands. There waxed the serpent so that he lies in the midst of the ocean, surrounds all the earth, and bites his own tail. Hel...
Page 22 - Fiorgvin's daughter, and from them is descended the family line that we call the yEsir race, who have resided in Old Asgard and the realms that belong to it, and that whole line of descent is of divine origin. And this is why he can be called All-father, that he is father of all the gods and of men and of everything that has been brought into being by him and his power. The earth was his daughter and his wife. Out of her he begot the first of his sons, that is Asa-Thor. He was possessed of power...

About the author (1916)

Snorri Sturluson's fame as a historian---his main work is the 16 sagas included in Heimskringla (c.1230), a monumental history of Norway from its beginning until 1177---lies both in his critical approach to sources and in his fine, realistic exposition of event and motivation. A similar combination of scholarly and imaginative talent is seen in The Prose Edda (c.1220). Intended to be a handbook in skaldic poetry, it preserves invaluable mythological tales that were on the verge of being forgotten even in Sturluson's time. A large part of what we know about Nordic mythology stems from his Edda. The bibliography that follows also lists the anonymous Egil's Saga (1200--30), which many expert Scandinavian medievalists (e.g., Sigurdur Nordal and Bjorn M. Olsen) attribute to Sturluson. It is a fascinating account of life in Norway, England, and Iceland and of the poet-warrior Egil, whose skaldic verse is renowned for its unusual emotional and personal qualities. Snorri Sturluson's own life was as eventful as those about whom he wrote. Returning to Iceland from exile in 1239, he again became deeply involved in serious power struggles and was murdered in 1241.

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