Handbook of Ceramics Glasses, and Diamonds

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McGraw Hill Professional, Apr 17, 2001 - Technology & Engineering - 848 pages
2 Reviews

Materials design, prototyping, and manufacturing resource

The be-all, end-all resource for product designers and industry specialists, Handbook of Ceramics, Glasses and Diamonds tells you how to get optimal performance from these materials. The Handbook is packed with materials properties, processes and requirements data. You get selection and design guidelines and valuable application insights, plus three chapters devoted exclusively to diamond technology. Written by leading materials expert Charles Harper, the Handbook brings you up to speed on cutting-edge ceramics, glasses and diamonds and their use innovative use in new products, including:


* Electronic ceramics and advanced ceramics/composites
* Advanced applications of glasses
* Process and properties of CVD diamonds
* Industrial diamonds and diamond technology applications

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Contents

CERAMIC MATERIALS AND PROPERTIES
1-1
CERAMICS GLASSES AND MICAS FOR ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS
2-1
ELECTRONIC CERAMICS
3-1
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Charles A. Harper, P.E., is President of Technology Seminars, Inc., of Lutherville, Maryland. A widely recognized expert in materials science and applications, he is the editor of McGraw-Hill's Plastics, Elastomers, and Composites, now in its Third Edition, and industry-leading Electronic Packaging and Interconnection Series. An innovator who has played important roles in both the Society of Plastics Engineers and the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineers, Mr. Harper is a frequent conference speaker and seminar lecturer. Before founding his own company, he worked for many years in product application and management specific to plastic materials and processes at Westinghouse. He is a graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Engineering.

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