Timetables of African-American History: A Chronology of the Most Important People and Events in African-American History

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Jan 19, 1996 - History - 400 pages
1 Review
From the first African communities in North America to the days of slavery, from the aesthetic achievements of the Harlem Renaissance to the political triumphs of the civil rights movement, from Harriet Tubman's creation of the Underground Railroad to the election of Carol Moseley Braun -- the first black woman senator -- in 1992, this comprehensive book illuminates African Americans both famous and little known.

Thousands of entries document historical moments, laws and legal actions, and noteworthy events in the areas of religion, the arts, sports, education, and science and technology. The varied accomplishments of black Americans come to life in brief profiles of Louis Armstrong, Salt-N-Pepa, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Joe Louis, Wilma Rudolph, Paul Robeson, General Colin Powell, and hundreds of others.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

The timetables of African-Amerian history: a chronology of the most important people and events in African-American history

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This addition to the "Simon and Schuster Timetables" reference series is in the now-familiar format of years subdivided by field of endeavor, enabling the researcher to see how the accomplishments of ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

p. 25 CPT Clarks Regiment trumpeter-a black man.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
63
Section 2
83
Section 3
85
Section 4
95
Section 5
117
Section 6
129
Section 7
143
Section 8
147
Section 13
171
Section 14
177
Section 15
205
Section 16
211
Section 17
238
Section 18
240
Section 19
283
Section 20
301

Section 9
151
Section 10
155
Section 11
161
Section 12
167
Section 21
331
Section 22
335
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Harley is an Associate Professor of Afro-American Studies and History at the University of Maryland in College Park.

Bibliographic information