Nonviolence to Animals, Earth, and Self in Asian Traditions

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SUNY Press, 1993 - Nature - 146 pages
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This book probes the origins of the practice of nonviolence in early India and traces its path within the Jaina, Hindu, and Buddhist traditions, including its impact on East Asian Cultures. It then turns to a variety of contemporary issues relating to this topic such as: vegetarianism, animal and environmental protection, and the cultivation of religious tolerance.
 

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Contents

Origins and Traditional Articulations of Ahimsa
3
Nonviolence Buddhism and Animal Protection
21
Nonviolent Asian Responses to the Environmental Crisis Select Contemporary Examples
49
The Nonviolent Self
73
Otherness and Nonviolence in the Mahabharata
75
Nonviolent Approaches to Multiplicity
85
The Jaina Tath of Wonresistant Death
99
Living Nonviolence
111
Notes
121
Index
141
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About the author (1993)

Christopher Key Chapple is Associate Professor of Theology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He is the author of Karma and Creativity, co-translator of the Yoga Sutras of PatanUjali, and editor of Winthrop Sargeant's translation of the Bhagavad Gita.