Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker

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Addison-Wesley Professional, 2003 - Computers - 433 pages
8 Reviews

The best-selling first edition of Firewalls and Internet Security became the bible of Internet security by showing readers how to think about threats and solutions. The completely updated and expanded second edition defines the security problems students face in today's Internet, identifies the weaknesses of the most popular security technologies, and illustrates the ins and outs of deploying an effective firewall. Students learn how to plan and execute a security strategy that allows easy access to Internet services while defeating even the wiliest of hackers. Written by well-known senior researchers at AT&T Bell Labs, Lumeta, and Johns Hopkins University the students will benefit from the actual, real-world experiences of the authors maintaining, improving, and redesigning AT&T's Internet gateway.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BrentNewhall - LibraryThing

Highly technical book, naturally, that deals with setting up a secure computer or network. Clear and useful. Particularly interesting for the account of extended attacks on AT&T's system during the first Gulf War. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
12 Picking a Security Policy
7
13 HostBased Security
10
15 Strategies for a Secure Network
11
16 The Ethics of Computer Security
16
17 WARNING
18
A Security Review of Protocols Lower Layers
19
22 Managing Addresses and Names
28
Filtering Services
197
101 Reasonable Services to Filter
198
102 Digging for Worms
206
103 Services We Dont Like
207
104 Other Services
209
105 Something New
210
Firewall Engineering
211
111 Rulesets
212

23 IP version 6
34
24 Network Address Translators
37
25 Wireless Security
38
Security Review The Upper Layers
41
32 Internet Telephony
46
33 RPCBased Protocols
47
34 File Transfer Protocols
52
35 Remote Login
58
36 Simple Network Management ProtocolSNMP
62
37 The Network Time Protocol
63
38 Information Services
64
39 Proprietary Protocols
68
310 PeertoPeer Networking
69
311 The X11 Window System
70
312 The Small Services
71
The Web Threat or Menace?
73
41 The Web Protocols
74
42 Risks to the Clients
79
43 Risks to the Server
85
44 Web Servers vs Firewalls
89
45 The Web and Databases
91
The Threats
93
Classes of Attacks
95
52 Social Engineering
98
53 Bugs and Back Doors
100
54 Authentication Failures
103
55 Protocol Failures
104
56 Information Leakage
105
57 Exponential AttacksViruses and Worms
106
58 DenialofService Attacks
107
59 Botnets
117
The Hackers Workbench and Other Munitions
119
62 Hacking Goals
121
64 Breaking into the Host
122
65 The Battle for the Host
123
66 Covering Tracks
126
67 Metastasis
127
68 Hacking Tools
128
69 Tiger Teams
132
Safer Tools and Services
135
Authentication
137
71 Remembering Passwords
138
72 TimeBased OneTime Passwords
144
73 ChallengeResponse OneTime Passwords
145
74 Lamports OneTime Password Algorithm
146
75 Smart Cards
147
77 RADIUS
148
An Authentication Framework
149
710 PKI
150
Using Some Tools and Services
153
82 SshTerminal and File Access
154
83 Syslog
158
84 Network Administration Tools
159
85 ChrootCaging Suspect Software
162
86 Jailing the Apache Web Server
165
87 AftpdA Simple Anonymous FTP Daemon
167
88 Mail Transfer Agents
168
An SMB Implementation
169
811 Taming Named
170
Firewalls and VPNs
173
Kinds of Firewalls
175
91 Packet Filters
176
92 ApplicationLevel Filtering
185
93 CircuitLevel Gateways
186
94 Dynamic Packet Filters
188
95 Distributed Firewalls
193
96 What Firewalls Cannot Do
194
112 Proxies
214
113 Building a Firewall from Scratch
215
114 Firewall Problems
227
115 Testing Firewalls
230
Tunneling and VPNs
233
121 Tunnels
234
122 Virtual Private Networks VPNs
236
123 Software vs Hardware
242
Protecting an Organization
245
Network Layout
247
131 Intranet Explorations
248
132 Intranet Routing Tricks
249
133 In Host We Trust
253
134 Belt and Suspenders
255
135 Placement Classes
257
Safe Hosts in a Hostile Environment
259
142 Properties of Secure Hosts
260
143 Hardware Configuration
265
144 FieldStripping a Host
266
145 Loading New Software
270
146 Administering a Secure Host
271
Life Without a Firewall
277
Intrusion Detection
279
151 Where to Monitor
280
152 Types of IDSs
281
153 Administering an IDS
282
Lessons Learned
285
An Evening with Berferd
287
162 An Evening with Berferd
290
163 The Day After
294
164 The Jail
295
165 Tracing Berferd
296
166 Berferd Comes Home
298
The Taking of Clark
301
171 Prelude
302
173 Crude Forensics
303
174 Examining CLARK
304
175 The Password File
310
177 Better Forensics
311
178 Lessons Learned
312
Secure Communications over Insecure Networks
313
181 The Kerberos Authentication System
314
182 LinkLevel Encryption
318
184 ApplicationLevel Encryption
322
Where Do We Go from Here?
329
192 DNSsec
330
194 Internet Ubiquity
331
196 Conclusion
332
Appendixes
333
An Introduction to Cryptography
335
A2 SecretKey Cryptography
337
A3 Modes of Operation
339
A4 Public Key Cryptography
342
A5 Exponential Key Exchange
343
A6 Digital Signatures
344
A7 Secure Hash Functions
346
A8 Timestamps
347
Keeping Up
349
B1 Mailing Lists
350
B2 Web Resources
351
B3 Peoples Pages
352
B5 Conferences
353
Bibliography
355
List of s
389
List of Acronyms
391
Index
397
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

William R. Cheswick (http://cheswick.com) is Chief Scientist at Lumeta Corporation, which explores and maps clients' network infrastructures and finds perimeter leaks. Formerly he was a senior researcher at Lucent Bell Labs, where he did pioneering work in the areas of firewall design and implementation, PC viruses, mailers, and Internet munitions.

Steven M. Bellovin (http://stevebellovin.com) is a Fellow at AT&T Labs Research, where he works on networks, security, and, especially, why the two don't get along. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is one of the Security Area directors of the Internet Engineering Task Force. Long ago he was one of the creators of NetNews.

Aviel D. Rubin (http://avirubin.com) is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Johns Hopkins University and serves as the Technical Director of their Information Security Institute. He was previously Principal Researcher in the Secure Systems Research Department at AT&T Laboratories and is the author of several books.



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