History of the City of New York

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1867
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Page 573 - Francis' tavern ; soon after which their beloved commander entered the room. His emotions were too strong to be concealed. Filling a glass, he turned to them and said, ' With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 443 - They complied without much reluctance with most of the requirements of the Mutiny Act, and projected another scheme which was viewed by the patriots with much distrust, as concealing some insidious snare for the liberties of the colonies. This was the emission of bills of credit to the amount of one hundred and twenty thousand pounds, to be loaned to the people, the interest of which was to be applied to the support of the colonial government. A grant of a thousand pounds from the treasury, together...
Page 491 - June 1776, ho submitted a resolution, declaring, " that the united colonies are and ought to be free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance, to the British crown ; and that all political connection, between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved.
Page 673 - Clinton as the first president, pledged themselves to use their utmost efforts to collect whatever might relate to the natural, civil, literary and ecclesiastical history of the United States in general, and of the State of New York in particular.
Page 537 - In crowded mansions pass the infernal night, Some for a bed their tatter'd vestments join, And some on chests, and some on floors recline ; Shut from the blessings of the evening air, Pensive we lay with mingled corpses there, Meagre and wan, and scorch'd with heat, below, We loom'd like ghosts, ere death had made us so...
Page 536 - Thou, Scorpion, fatal to thy crowded throng, Dire theme of horror and Plutonian song, Requir'st my lay — thy sultry decks I know, And all the torments that exist below!
Page 515 - In the suffocating heat of summer,' says Wm. Dunlap, 'I saw every narrow aperture of these stone walls filled with human heads, face above face, seeking a portion of the external air.
Page 723 - ... improvement that sprung into existence during the year 1825 ; gas-pipes, joint-stock companies, the opera, the Sunday press, and the Merchants' Exchange, all made their first advent in the great metropolis in the course of the same year. First, of the introduction of gas into the city. Hitherto, the streets had been dimly lighted with oil ; and though efforts had been made to substitute something better, and experiments had even been made in the Park with gas-lights as early as the summer of...
Page 468 - Resolved, That whoever shall be aiding, or assisting, in the landing, or carting of such tea, from any ship, or vessel, or shall hire any house, store-house, or cellar or any place whatsoever, to deposit the tea, subject to a duty as aforesaid, he shall be deemed an enemy to the liberties of America.
Page 538 - And, as you may suppose, was own'da quack. He on his charge the healing work begun With antimonial mixtures, by the tun, Ten minutes was the time he...

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