A Journal of Travels in England, Holland and Scotland: And of Two Passages Over the Atlantic, in the Years 1805 and 1806; with Considerable Additions, Volume 2

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S. Converse, 1820 - Great Britain
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vol.2

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Page 2 - BBOWN, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as author, in the words following, to wit : " Sertorius : or, the Roman Patriot.
Page 231 - Thrice happy bird ! I too have seen Much of the vanities of men ; And, sick of having seen 'em, Would cheerfully these limbs resign For such a pair of wings as thine, And such a head between 'em.
Page 108 - A messenger of grace to guilty men. Behold the picture ! Is it like ? —Like whom ? The things that mount the rostrum with a skip, And then skip down again ; pronounce a text ; Cry — hem ; and reading what they never wrote, Just fifteen minutes, huddle up their work, And with a well-bred whisper close the scene...
Page 230 - You think, no doubt, he sits and muses On future broken bones and bruises, If he should chance to fall. No ; not a single thought like that Employs his philosophic pate, Or troubles it at all.
Page 90 - Heavens! what a goodly prospect spreads around. Of hills, and dales, and woods, and lawns, and spires, And glittering towns, and gilded streams, till all The stretching landscape into smoke decays!
Page 89 - Now to the sister-hills* that skirt her plain ; To lofty Harrow now ; and now to where Majestic Windsor lifts his princely brow. In lovely contrast to this glorious view, Calmly magnificent, then will we turn To where the silver Thames first rural grows. There let the feasted eye unwearied stray ; Luxurious there, rove through the pendant woods That nodding hang o'er Harrington's retreat...
Page 228 - I am monarch of all I survey, My right there is none to dispute.
Page 120 - The Castle of Indolence,' &c. who died at Richmond, on the 22nd of August, and was buried there on the 29th, OS 1748. The Earl of Buchan, unwilling that so good a man and sweet a poet should be without a memorial, has denoted the place of his interment for the satisfaction of his admirers, in the year of our Lord 1792.
Page 120 - Father of light and life, Thou Good Supreme ! O teach me what is good ; teach me Thyself ! Save me from folly, vanity, and vice, From every low pursuit ; and feed my soul With knowledge, conscious peace, and virtue pure, Sacred, substantial, never-fading bliss...
Page 2 - An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,' and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.

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