"Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!": Adventures of a Curious Character

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W. W. Norton & Company, Feb 6, 2018 - Biography & Autobiography - 400 pages

One of the most famous science books of our time, the phenomenal national bestseller that "buzzes with energy, anecdote and life. It almost makes you want to become a physicist" (Science Digest).

Richard P. Feynman, winner of the Nobel Prize in physics, thrived on outrageous adventures. In this lively work that “can shatter the stereotype of the stuffy scientist” (Detroit Free Press), Feynman recounts his experiences trading ideas on atomic physics with Einstein and cracking the uncrackable safes guarding the most deeply held nuclear secrets—and much more of an eyebrow-raising nature. In his stories, Feynman’s life shines through in all its eccentric glory—a combustible mixture of high intelligence, unlimited curiosity, and raging chutzpah.

Included for this edition is a new introduction by Bill Gates.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Razinha - LibraryThing

This has been on The List for a long time and finally took the time to read it. I am familiar with Feynmen's brilliance, and somewhat with his whimsy but this was enlightening. His revealed character ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nosborm - LibraryThing

Definitely an interesting read (and brief) but Feynman can be repetitive and a bit of a braggart. Worth reading if you're interested in physics, science, famous scientists, or intriguing little one ... Read full review

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Contents

Introduction by Bill Gates
STRING BEANS
LATIN OR ITALIAN?
THE CHIEF RESEARCH CHEMIST OF THE METAPLAST
SURELY YOURE JOKING MR FEYNMAN
MEEEEEEEEEEE
MONSTER MINDS
A DIFFERENT BOX OF TOOLS
THE AMATEUR SCIENTIST
Part 3
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Richard P. Feynman (1918–1988) was a professor at Cornell University and CalTech and received the Nobel Prize for physics in 1965. In 1986 he served with distinction on the Rogers Commission investigating the space shuttle Challenger disaster.

Ralph Leighton lives in northern California.

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