The three eras of Ottoman history, a political essay on the late reforms of Turkey, considered principally as affecting her position in the event of a war taking place

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Chapman and Hall, 1851 - 83 pages
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Page 52 - High, assisted by the intercession of our Prophet, we deem it right to seek by new institutions to give to the Provinces composing the Ottoman Empire the benefit of a good Administration.
Page 52 - ... are endangered? If, on the contrary, he enjoys in that respect perfect security, he will not depart from the ways of loyalty, and all his actions will contribute to the good of the government and of his brothers. If there is an absence of security...
Page 65 - Colonel and the Major, the command of the Battalion is taken by the senior Captains, who cannot possess the general experience in the regiment which an Adjutant has the means of acquiring. In the Turkish army the rank of Adjutant is higher than that of Captain, and most military men will probably admit that this is an excellent arrangement. All the Officers rise from the ranks, excepting those who have come from the military schools. Each Ordu of the Turkish forces has a preparatory school, and there...
Page 33 - ... artillery, having torn off the badges which were also worn by those abhorred regiments, that all appearance of fellowship with them might at once be destroyed, commenced the attack. Three hours, with 4,000 artillerymen and students, incited by that resolute will which had foreseen and provided for every casualty during eighteen years of apparent submission to the tyranny of a caste, sufficed to annihilate the military ascendancy which had once made the Sovereigns of Europe tremble abroad, as...
Page 55 - ... the imposition of the taxes. Every one in these assemblies will state his ideas freely, and give his opinion. " The laws relating to the regulations of the military service will be discussed by the Military Council, holding its meetings at the Palace of the Seraskier. As soon as a law is decided upon, it will be presented to us, and in order that it may be eternally valid and applicable, we will confirm it by our sanction, written above it with our Imperial hand. " As these present institutions...
Page 50 - Osmaiili, and by giving them a guarantee that these concessions would be maintained. To Reschid Pacha the Ottoman empire is indebted for the organic law of equality, tolerance, and personal freedom and security, for the abolition of mercantile monopolies, for the establishment of sanitary regulations, for the submission of the provinces, for the concentration of political power, for the advantageous stipulations of 1840 with the great Cabinets of Europe, and for the commercial treaties which have...
Page 52 - ... country, if his life and honour are endangered ? If, on the contrary, he enjoys in that respect perfect safety, he will not deviate from the paths of loyalty, and all his acts will contribute to the good of the Government and his fellow-subjects. " With regard to regular and fixed taxes, this must be settled, because a state, which for the defence of its territory is forced to incur various expenses, cannot procure the funds necessary for its armies and other wants, otherwise than by contributions...
Page 52 - ... Ottoman Empire the benefit of a good administration. " This must be based on three points : 1. The conditions, which ensure to our subjects the enjoyment of perfect security of life, honour, and property. 2. A regular mode of collecting the taxes. 3. A method equally regular of recruiting soldiers, and fixing their term of service. " And indeed are not life and honour the most precious enjoyments that exist ? What man, whatever repugnance his character may inspire against violence, will be able...
Page 55 - As a pledge for our promise, we intend, after having deposited them in the hall which contains the glorious relics of the Prophet, in the presence of all the Ulema and Grandees of the Empire, to take an oath in the name of the Almighty, and cause the Ulema and Grandees also to swear to that effect. " After that, any one of the Ulema or Grandees, or any other person whatsoever who violates these institutions, will undergo, without...
Page 60 - ... resides principally at Constantinople. He is a Vizir of the Empire. On extraordinary occasions, when the Standard of the Prophet is unfurled, the Grand Vizir in person assumes the command of the army, but accompanies it only a few miles beyond the gates of the capital. The whole Ordu is made up of eleven regiments, six of Infantry, four of Cavalry, and one of Artillery. Each Infantry Regiment is formed of four Battalions of eight Companies. The regulation strength of each battalion is 815 men,...

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