Reconstructing Kobe: The Geography of Crisis and Opportunity

Front Cover
UBC Press, Jan 1, 2011 - Social Science - 328 pages

Six thousand people died and hundreds of thousands lost their homes when an earthquake hit Kobe in January 1995. The Hanshin Earthquake was the largest disaster to affect postwar Japan and one of the most destructive postwar natural disasters to strike a developed country. Although the media focused on the disaster's immediate effects, the long-term reconstruction efforts have gone largely unexplored.

Based on fieldwork and interviews with planners, activists, and bureaucrats, Reconstructing Kobe records the first ten years of reconstruction and recovery and offers detailed descriptions of the geography of crisis and opportunity. Which districts were most vulnerable to the quake and why? Did planners successfully exploit opportunities to revitalize the city and make it more sustainable and disaster proof? David Edgington's intricate investigation of one of the largest redevelopments in recent history offers a compelling post-disaster case study for planners and policy makers and is essential reading for students and scholars of Japanese urban and planning history.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Earthquakes and Urban Reconstruction
17
3 Kobe and the Hanshin Earthquake
35
4 The Planning and Reconstruction Response
77
5 Protest Participation and the Phoenix Plan
105
6 Neighbourhood Case Studies
127
7 Symbolic Projects and the Local Economy
179
8 Conclusion
209
Appendices
233
Notes
251
References
269
Index
287
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

David W. Edgington is a former director of the Centre for Japanese Research and an associate professor of geography at the University of British Columbia.

Bibliographic information