How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion

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Bloomsbury, 2005 - Revolutions - 176 pages
97 Reviews

How do you spot a robot mimicking a human? How do you recognise and then deactivate a rebel servant robot? How do you escape a murderous 'smart' house, or evade a swarm of marauding robotic flies?

In this dryly hilarious survival guide, roboticist Daniel H. Wilson teaches worried humans the keys to quashing a robot mutiny. From treating laser wounds to fooling face and gait recognition, besting robot logic to engaging in hand-to-pincher combat, How to Survive a Robot Uprising covers every possible doomsday scenario facing the newest endangered species: humans. And with its thorough overview of current robot prototypes - including giant walkers, insect, dog, and snake robots - How to Survive a Robot Uprising is also a witty yet legitimate introduction to contemporary robotics.

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Full of handy, well-researched tips. - Goodreads
A lot of research has gone into its writing. - Goodreads
I thought this was both educational and funny. - Goodreads
Great stylized illustrations. - Goodreads
Hilarious. I love doing research :) - Goodreads
Instructions for such a project are not included.) - Book Verdict

Review: How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion

User Review  - Steven Shinder - Goodreads

There was some humor here and there, including references to 2001: A Space Odyssey, Alien(s), Futurama, the I, Robot film, Knight Rider, The Matrix trilogy, Star Wars, and the Terminator trilogy (at ... Read full review

Review: How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion

User Review  - Misty - Goodreads

I have an irrational fear of robots and eventhough this is a satirical book it is based off of scientific fact and just enough of it to remind me that my toaster is plotting my demise. Read full review

About the author (2005)

Daniel H. Wilson is a roboticist at Carnegie-Mellon's Robotics Institute.

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