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Books Books 1 - 9 of 9 on Old ft. And more, and more ; mistake not. I do not all this while accompt you in....
" Old ft. And more, and more ; mistake not. I do not all this while accompt you in The list of those are call'd the blades, that roar In brothels, and break windows ; fright the streets At midnight worse than constables, and sometimes Set upon innocent... "
The dramatic works and poems of James Shirley - Page 197
by James Shirley, William Gifford, Alexander Dyce - 1833 - 1 pages
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British Theatre, Volume 15

John Bell - English drama - 1792
...luck To kill so many as another, dares Fight with all them that have. Haz. You have heard this ? Barn. And more, and more; mistake not, I do not all this while account you in The list of those are called the blades, that roar In brothels, and break windows, that...
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The Dramatic Works of John Ford: The lady's trial. The sun's garling. The ...

John Ford - 1831
...whit, sir. Barnacle. Mistake not, I do not all this while account you in The list of those are called the blades, that roar In brothels, and break windows...bell-men, to beget Discourse for a week's diet; that swear dammes, To pay their debts; and march like walking armories, With poniard, pistol, rapier, and batoon,...
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The dramatic works of John Ford: with an introduction, and notes ..., Volume 2

John Ford - 1831
...roar, to dice, to drab, to quarrel. I do not all this while account you in The list of those are called the blades, that roar In brothels, and break windows...to beget Discourse for a week's diet ; that swear dammes, To pay their debts ; and march like walking armories, With poniard, pistol, rapier, and batoon,...
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The Penny Magazine of the Society for the Diffusion of ..., Volume 2; Volume 11

Charles Knight - 1842
...detection and punishment. But at the time of which we write, Shirley, in ' The Gamester,' describes— " The blades that roar In brothels, and break windows : fright the streets At midnight worse than constable.«, and sometimes Set upon innocent ЬеПтепД to beget Discourse for a week's diet :...
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The Dramatic Works and Poems of James Shirley, Now First Collected: The ball ...

James Shirley, William Gifford, Alexander Dyce - 1833
...abuse, 1 will not question it: Pray, to the point; I do not think you come To have me be your second. Old ft. And more, and more ; mistake not. I do not...Discourse for a week's diet; that swear, damn-mes, Topaytheirdebts,and march like walking armories, With poniard, pistol, rapier, and batoon, As they...
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The lover's seat. Kathemérina; or, Common things in relation to beauty ...

Kenelm Henry Digby - 1856
...beer, he utters sentences, And after sack, philosophy." But what will you say of him who loves to " Fright the streets At midnight, worse than constables;...bellmen, to beget Discourse for a week's diet; that swear damme's To pay their debts; and march like walking armories, With poniard, pistol, rapier, and baton,...
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Idle Hours in a Library

William Henry Hudson - English literature - 1897 - 238 pages
...described in Shirley's "Gamester,"— "that roar In brothels, and break windows, fright the streets, And sometimes set upon innocent bell-men to beget Discourse for a week's diet," and whom Jonson's Kastril looked up to with so much admiration and respect. I could not hope by any...
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Idle Hours in a Library

William Henry Hudson - English literature - 1897 - 238 pages
...described in Shirley's "Gamester,"— "that roar In brothels, and break windows, fright the streets, And sometimes set upon innocent bell-men to beget Discourse for a week's diet," and whom Jonson's Kastril looked up to with so much admiration and respect. I could not hope by any...
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At Day's Close: Night in Times Past

A. Roger Ekirch - History - 2005 - 447 pages
...advanced years made them objects of greater contempt. James Shirley's play The Gamester (1633) spoke of “blades, that roar, / In brothels, and break windows, fright the streets, / At midnight worse that constables, and sometimes, / Set upon innocent bell-men.” Following a masquerade, a band of...
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