Porcupine, Picayune, and Post: How Newspapers Get Their Names

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University of Missouri Press, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 216 pages
"Porcupine, Picayune, & Post examines the history and etymology of newspapers' names. Bernhard focuses on printed general-interest English-language dailies and weeklies, from the Choteau (Montana) Acantha to the Moab (Utah) Zephyr, with everything in between"--Provided by publisher.
 

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Contents

1 Whats in a Name?
1
2 In the Beginning
7
3 Rule Britannia
20
4 Youve Got Mail
28
5 Gray Ladies No More
37
6 Print the News and Raise Hell
47
7 Party Time
62
8 Sound the Alarm
72
12 Mythellaneous
112
13 The Wheel and Other Inventions
118
14 Location Location Location
129
15 Oddities
144
16 The Brute the Beast and Other Figments
167
17 All in Fun
172
18 So Sue Me
176
Bibliography
183

9 Let There Be Light
81
10 AdvertisementsThe Life of a Paper
93
11 Flora and Fauna
102

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Page x - newspaper " shall mean any paper containing public news, intelligence, or occurrences, or any remarks or observations therein printed for sale, and published in England or Ireland periodically, or in parts or numbers at intervals not exceeding twenty-six days between the publication of any two such papers, parts, or numbers.

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