A first Greek writer, with exercises. [With] Key

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1883
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Page v - The object of this little book is to help those who are beginning Greek to learn from the first to write the language as well as read it. There is among many teachers a strong belief (which I am inclined to share) that Greek is mastered much more effectively if a little writing be combined with the reading, even from the earliest stages. " The great inferiority of the knowledge of Greek acquired at Schools is partly no doubt due to the language being harder, and being begun later : but partly also...
Page 18 - Attracted. (1.) When the antecedent is in the Genitive or Dative, and the Relative would...
Page 32 - ... new and delightful discovery. I used to wonder how a man of such extraordinary ability and attainments could descend to the commonplaces of the language. I see now that he recognised his function as a teacher and did the work at his hand honestly and thoroughly ! ' When the subject of the Infinitive is the same as the subject of the principal verb, it is put in the Nominative case ' falls as distinctly on my ear to-day as it did five and twenty years ago. In the Middle Class one lecture was given...
Page vii - This plan, which is intended to diminish the dullness of doing English into Greek, is even more desirable at the early stages of Composition than at the later, inasmuch as the boys are younger, and the accidence must in any case be great drudgery. It is not at all necessary that anything of value should be sacrificed in adopting this plan, if proper care be taken. The main difficulty of course was in the first exercises, where only a few substantives and adjectives are supposed to be known : but...
Page 174 - I had seen the sun in the night ?" hoping that some one would answer that he had seen a divine marvel. But the first child, being a rustic, said, " I for my part should say that you saw not the sun really, but the moon.
Page viii - ... unobjectionable but advantageous. ** I have given all the new words used in each exercise in a vocabulary at the head of it, and all the words of all the exercises in the collected vocabulary at the end. Thus if the learner remembers the words he has already had, he will want no help but his Accidence and the page before him: if he forgets them, he will simply have to turn to the vocabulary at the end. In the vocabularies I have given the stems of the substantives, and the genders were doubtful...
Page vii - ... any other verbs were used giving the part required. Thus from the first the exercises are more or less connected wholes ; and the plan of familiarising the learner with certain common forms of the verb before he comes to learn them seems not only unobjectionable but advantageous. ** I have given all the new words used in each exercise in a vocabulary at the head of it, and all the words of all the exercises in the collected vocabulary at the end. Thus if the learner remembers the words he has...
Page 184 - And the bystanders raised him up, as he was1 unable to get up, and bore him to his house. And when certain persons advised to send for a...
Page viii - ... exercises are more or less connected wholes ; and the plan of familiarising the learner with certain common forms of the verb before he comes to learn them seems not only unobjectionable but advantageous. ** I have given all the new words used in each exercise in a vocabulary at the head of it, and all the words of all the exercises in the collected vocabulary at the end. Thus if the learner remembers the words he has already had, he will want no help but his Accidence and the page before him:...
Page 39 - UE (cf. 15:22); in the gen. abs. xQoaevypiiEvov |iov referring to a noun or pronoun already in the sentence, with no attempt to bring the cases into line (cf.

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