The Coming Race

Front Cover
Health Research Books, 1967 - Fiction - 144 pages
1 Review
First published in 1871, this early science fiction novel describes a Utopian future civilization based upon a renewable energy source and the conflict between this world and our own. Prescient for its time, it depicts a world of air travel and advanced technology in a subterranean landscape.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TrysB - LibraryThing

This is sort of an early science fiction novel in which an advanced race of humans called the Vrilya are discovered dwelling underground. they have a limitless source of power and energy called vril ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Stevil2001 - LibraryThing

In this novel, an itinerant American man discovers a secret civilization, much older than humanity, hidden beneath the surface of the Earth. I say "novel," but really it's an extended description ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
12
Section 4
23
Section 5
24
Section 6
30
Section 7
31
Section 8
44
Section 9
52
Section 10
75
Section 11
85
Section 12
130
Section 13
136

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1967)

Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Lord of Lytton, was born on May 25, 1803 in London, England. He entered Trinity College, Cambridge in 1822, won the Chancellor's Gold Medal for English verse in 1825, and received a B.A. degree the following year. He was a novelist, poet, playwright, and politician. He coined the phrases the "pursuit of the almighty dollar", "the pen is mightier than the sword", and the opening line "It was a dark and stormy night". He wrote in a variety of genres, including historical fiction, mystery, romance, the occult, and science fiction. His works included Falkland, Pelham, Eugene Aram, The Last Days of Pompei, Ernest Maltravers, Zanoni, The Last of the Barons, The Caxtons, and A Strange Story. He also published several volumes of poetry including Ismael and The New Timon. His best known play was The Lady of Lyons. He served as the Secretary of State for the Colonies in from 1858 to 1859 and played a large part in the organization of the new colony of British Columbia. He became Baron Lytton of Knebworth in July 1866 and thereafter took his place in the House of Peers. He died on May 23, 1873, just short of his 70th birthday. The cause of death was not clear but it was thought that an infection he had in his ear had affected his brain.

Bibliographic information