Scientific Methods in Mobile Robotics: Quantitative Analysis of Agent Behaviour

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Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 10, 2006 - Computers - 207 pages
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Mobile robotics is a cutting-edge research topic, which until recently has primarily focused on issues such as the design of controllers and robot hardware. The field is now ready to embrace theoretical methods from dynamical systems theory, statistics and system identification to produce quantitative analyses and computer models of robot-environment interaction.

Scientific Methods in Mobile Robotics: Quantitative Analysis of Agent Behaviour is a decisive step towards a theoretical understanding of the operation of autonomous mobile robotics. This book presents cutting-edge research results on the application of chaos theory, parametric and non-parametric statistics and dynamical systems theory in mobile robotics. It presents foundations of a theory of mobile robotics by providing a quantitative analysis of the interaction between robot, task and environment. Practical examples and case studies show how robot behaviour can be logged, modelled, analysed and interpreted. This new approach will aid the design of controllers, analysis of agent behaviour and the verification of experimental results.

As the first book to apply advanced scientific methods to the growing field of mobile robots, Scientific Methods in Mobile Robotics: Quantitative Analysis of Agent Behaviour will interest researchers, lecturers and post-graduate students in robotics, artificial intelligence and cognitive science.

 

 

 

 

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Contents

A Brief Introduction to Mobile Robotics
1
13 The Emergence of Behaviour
5
14 Examples of Research Issues in Autonomous Mobile Robotics
7
15 Summary
9
Introduction to Scientific Methods in Mobile Robotics
11
Analytical Robotics
13
23 RobotEnvironment Interaction as Computation
15
24 A Theory of RobotEnvironment Interaction 241 Definition
16
The Lyapunov Exponent
100
The Dimension of Attractors
116
46 Summary
119
Analysis of Agent Behaviour Case Studies
121
52 Chaos Walker
126
53 Analysing the Flight Paths of Carrier Pigeons
133
Computer Modelling of RobotEnvironment Interaction
139
62 Some Practical Considerations Regarding Robot Modelling
141

25 Robot Engineering vs Robot Science
18
26 Scientific Method and Autonomous Mobile Robotics 261 Introduction
19
27 Tools Used in this Book
27
The Contrast Between Experimental Mobile Robotics and Scientific Mobile Robotics
28
Statistical Tools for Describing Experimental Data
29
32 The Normal Distribution
30
33 Parametric Methods to Compare Samples 331 General Considerations Significance Levels
33
34 NonParametric Methods to Compare Samples
43
35 Testing for Randomness in a Sequence
55
36 Parametric Tests for a Trend Correlation Analysis
57
37 NonParametric Tests for a Trend 371 Spearman Rank Correlation
65
38 Analysing Categorical Data
69
39 Principal Component Analysis
80
Dynamical Systems Theory and Agent Behaviour
85
43 Describing Robot Behaviour Quantitatively Through Phase Space Analysis
95
Model Acquisition Using Artificial Neural Networks
143
64 Linear Polynomial Models and Linear Recurrence Relations
150
65 NARMAX Modelling
155
Environment Identification
156
67 Task Identification
173
68 Sensor Identification
184
69 When Are Two Behaviours the Same?
185
610 Conclusion
193
Conclusion
195
72 Quantitative Descriptions of RobotEnvironment Interaction
196
73 A Theory of RobotEnvironment Interaction
197
Towards Analytical Robotics
199
References
201
Index
205
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Dr Ulrich Nehmzow is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Essex, UK. The Robotics group in this department is the largest in the UK and considered to be one of the world’s leading in this subject.

Dr Nehmzow is the publisher of the SV London textbook, Mobile Robotics: A Practical Introduction, now in its second edition (1-85233-726-5, 2003). He has over ten years’ experience in mobile robotics and is considered to be an authoritative researcher in the experimental end of the subject. The author has recently commenced a one-year research sabbatical at the University of Wollongong, Australia. He aims to use some of this year writing his book.