Primitive Civilizations: Or, Outlines of the History of Ownership in Archaic Communities

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 4, 2010 - History - 592 pages
Edith Simcox (1844-1901) was a prominent British feminist, social critic, and prolific writer. She published many articles and essays advocating support for women's rights to education, improved working conditions and suffrage. Her scholarly works in philosophy and economic history sought to demonstrate that contemporary capitalism was not the only route to a prosperous society. These volumes, first published in 1897, contain a comparative analysis of the economic history of ancient societies. Simcox discusses and compares aspects of economic history including ownership, industry and commerce, and domestic relations and ownership rights within families, in ancient Egypt, Sumeria and China. Through her comparisons, this pioneering volume examines economic effects on the proprietary rights of women, demonstrating that gender relations and contemporary ideals were not consistent across ancient cultures. Volume 1 contains her discussions of Egypt and Babylonia. For more information on this author, see http://orlando.cambridge.org/public/svPeople?person_id=simced
 

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Contents

Prehistoric Problems
14
The Monarchy and the Royal Officers
37
The Economic Order
65
Commerce and Industry
94
The National Religion and the Priesthood
144
Civil Law and Custom
181
Domestic Relations and Family Law
198
Sumerian Civilization
229
Commercial Law and Contract Tablets
320
Domestic Relations and Family Law
360
From Massalia to Malabar
383
The Phoenicians and Carthage
389
Prehistoric Populations of Asia Minor Greece
412
The Etruscans Lycians and Rhodians
425
The Laws of Charondas
445
A Syrian LawBook
487

Babylonian Chronology
252
The Ancient Cities of Sumer and Akkad
261
CHAPTER PAGE
282
Ancient Arabia
496
Hamitic African Tribes
530
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