Official Guide to the Museums of Economic Botany: No. 3. Timbers, Issue 3 (Google eBook)

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1893 - Botanical museums - 98 pages
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Page 19 - The wheels of our ordnance carriages have ' never failed, however arduous or lengthened the service has been on which they have 'been employed, of which no more striking example can be furnished than the cam'paign in Afghanistan, about the most trying country in the world for wheels. Some ' of our batteries served throughout the campaign, went to Bameean and even to the 'Hindoo Koosh, and came back again to India without a break-down, while Royal ' Artillery wheels, built of the very best materials...
Page 12 - Deodar wood is extremely durable, being by far the most durable of the woods of the Himalayan Conifers. It is the chief timber of North-West India and is used for all purposes of construction, for railway sleepers, bridges, and even for furniture and shingles. An oil is obtained from the wood by destructive distillation ; it is darkcoloured, thick, .nui resembles crude turpentine.
Page 18 - It is— or rather used to be, for very large trees are now rather scarce — hollowed out for dug-out canoes in Bengal and Assam. In Bengal, Assam, and Burma it grows to a very large size, trees 20 feet...
Page 3 - ... buildings within the Royal Botanic Gardens. MUSEUM No. I. overlooks the ornamental water, and is directly ,opposite to the Palm-Stove. MUSEUM No. II. is three minutes' walk from No. I. Its direction is shown by a finger-post standing by the entrance to the latter. MUSEUM No. III., devoted chiefly to specimens of Timber and large articles unsuited for exhibition in the cabinets of the other Museums, occupies the building known as the "Orangery," at the north extremity of the Broad Walk, leading...
Page 20 - ... pedicels shorter than flowers ; bracts minute, caducous. Ovary oblong : style ascending, with a large, peltate stigma. Legume lanceolate, 2-3 in. long, with parallel longitudinal veins, a solitary seed near the top. In dry forests of South and Central India, but not everywhere ; generally gregarious in belts or patches of greater or less extent. It is wanting in the moister forests below and above Ghat on the west side of the Peninsula. In Central India, the tree is known in Chanda, Berar, Khandeish,...
Page 11 - The durability is probably due to the large amount of oil contained in the wood. This oil is used medicinally, as a substitute for linseed oil and as a varnish...
Page 25 - Dry regioa of South India. It grows naturally in the drier parts of Mysore, Coimbatore and Salem districts, extending south to Madura and north to...
Page 52 - ... the United States east of the prairies, beyond the Mississippi, and in Mexico. In the north beyond 42d degree of latitude near the Atlantic, it is only a shrub in size, but it exists as a tree in upper Canada 20 to 30 feet high. In the Middle States it attains, in favorable positions in good soil, a height of 30 to 40 feet, and a diameter of from 12 to 18 and even 24 inches, but such trees are now rare. Further south, especially in Virginia and Carolina, it attains a greater height and size.
Page 77 - Laws.). The bull pine occurs on the higher slopes and in the upper canyons of the Guadalupe and Davis mountains. It is the prevalent and most valuable pine of these mountains, with a trunk 1 to 2 feet in diameter. The wood is hard, heavy, and durable, making excellent lumber and very good fuel. Range. — From the interior of British Columbia, south of latitude 51, and the Black Hills region of Dakota, southward in the Pacific and Rocky Mountain regions to western Texas and Mexico. Loblolly pine,...
Page 27 - India beams are sometimes found to last well, at other times to perish from dry rot or the attacks of insects.

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