A Short Account of the History of Mathematics

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Courier Corporation, 1960 - Mathematics - 522 pages
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This text remains one of the clearest, most authoritative and most accurate works in the field. The standard history treats hundreds of figures and schools instrumental in the development of mathematics, from the Phoenicians to such 19th-century giants as Grassman, Galois, and Riemann.
 

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From a math teacher who regularly studies mathematical history:
When reading the sections pertaining to, as the author puts is, non-european mathematicians, it becomes painfully obvious that few
changes have been made to this book since its first publishing in 1983. The publishing of this book is missing over 100 years of modern archaeological discoveries, which have greatly changed much of how historians, anthropologists, and mathematicians look at people throughout history. The author is extremely Euro-centric, mentions in several passages the superiority of certain races over others, using phrases like "the more civilized races" and writing passages like the following:
"The Hindoos, like the Chinese, have pretended that they are the most ancient people on the face of the earth, and that to them all sciences owe their creation. But is is probably that these pretensions have no foundation; and in fact no science or useful art (except a rather fantastic architecture and sculpture) can be definitely traced back to the inhabitants of the Indian peninsula prior to the Aryan invasion. This invasion seems to have taken place at some time in the latter half of the fifth century or in the sixth century, when a tribe of Aryans entered India by the north-west frontier, established themselves as rulers over a large part of the country. Their descendants, wherever they have kept their blood pure, may still be recognized by their superiority over the races they originally conquered; but as in the case with the modern Europeans, they found the climate trying and gradually degenerated."
<<<Please read Mathematical Thought From Ancient To Modern Times by Morris Kline instead>>>
 

Contents

III
1
IV
11
V
13
VI
33
VII
50
VIII
93
IX
116
X
121
XIV
182
XV
199
XVI
244
XVII
263
XVIII
268
XIX
319
XX
353
XXI
391

XI
131
XII
144
XIII
164
XXII
444
XXIII
499
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