Gl'ingannati [orig. publ. as Il sacrificio]. The deceived: a comedy [for the Accademia degli intronati, transl.]: and Aelia Laelia Crispis (an attempt to solve the aenigma). By T.L. Peacock

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1862
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Page 5 - Will, much like the comedy of errors, or Menechmi in Plautus, but most like and neere to that in Italian called Inganni. A good practise in it to make the steward believe his lady widdowe was in love with him, by counterfayting a letter, as from his lady, in...
Page 5 - Plautus, but most like and neere to that in Italian called Inganni. A good practise in it to make the steward believe his lady widdowe was in love with him, by counterfayting a letter, as from his lady, in generall termes telling him what shee liked best in him, and prescribing his gestures, inscribing his apparaile, &c., and then, when he came to practise, making him beleeve they tooke him to be mad.
Page 24 - What will people say when this shall be known ? Lelia. Who will know it, if you do not tell it? Now, what I want you to do is this : that, as my father returned yesterday, and may perhaps send for me, you would prevent his doing so for four or five days, and at the end of that time I will return.
Page 58 - Some Fury's in that gut: Hungry again ! Did you not devour, this morning. A shield of brawn, and a barrel of Colchester oysters ? GREEDY. Why, that was, sir, only to scour my stomach, A kind of a preparative.
Page 35 - I fear this has been the cause of my misfortune ; for I loved very warmly that Lelia Bellenzini of whom I have spoken; and I fear Isabella thinks this love still lasts, and on that account will not see me ; but I will give Isabella to understand that I love Lelia no longer ; rather that I hate her, and cannot bear to hear her named, and will pledge my faith never to go where she may be. Tell Isabella this as strongly as you can. Lelia. Oh me ! Flam. What has come over you ? What do you feel ? Lelia....
Page 36 - To what are we subject ! I would not, for all I am •worth, that anything should happen to him, for there never was in the world a more diligent and well-mannered servant, nor one more cordially attached to his master. (Flaminio goes off, and Lelia returns.} Lelia. Oh, wretched Lelia ! Now you have heard from the mouth of this ungrateful Flaminio, how well he loves you. Why do you lose your time in following one so false and so cruel ? All your former love, your favours, and your prayers, were thrown...
Page 30 - How many are there in this city, that would think the love of Isabella the choicest gift of heaven ! Lelia. Then let her give it to them. : and leave alone me, who do not care for it. Pasquella. Oh, heaven ! how true is it, that boys have no brains. Oh, dear, dear Fabio, pray come, and come soon, or she will send me for you again, and will not believe that I have delivered her message. Lelia. Well, Pasquella, go home. I did but jest. I will come. Pasquella. When, my jewel 1 Lelia.
Page 53 - Oh, to be sure ; you have all the nobility of the Maremma. I am better born than you. What are you but the son of a muleteer ? This upstart, because he can say cujus masculini, thinks he may set his foot on every man's neck.
Page 21 - It happened at this time that Flaminio Carandini, from having been attached to the same party as ourselves, formed an intimate friendship with my father, came daily to our house, began to admire me secretly, then took to sighing and casting down his eyes.
Page 52 - Piero. You ought to have fifty bastinadoes, to teach you to keep him company when he goes out, and not to get drunk and sleep as you have done, and let him go about alone. Stragualcia. And you ought to be loaded with birch and broom, sulphur, pitch, and gunpowder, and set on fire to teach you not to be what you are.

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