Rational rhetoric: the role of science in popular discourse

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Parlor Press, Jul 22, 2008 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 455 pages
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RATIONAL RHETORIu THE ROLE OF SCIENCE IN POPULAR DISCOURSE places popular representations of science and scientific discourse under the terministic lenses of rhetorical theory, cultural studies, and language theory. DAVID J. TIETGE ranges broadly and insightfully across a wide range of scientific discourse and ideology as it is reconfigured for general consumption, in popular science writing (from Carl Sagan to Stephen Hawking and Stephen J. Gould), magazines (from Scientific American to Time and Social Text), news media (from CNN to The Discovery Channel), the public controversies over evolution, creationism, and intelligent design, and even pop psychology (Oprah, The Dr. Phil Show). The result is a tour de force reconceptualization of the enormous impact that our understanding (and misunderstanding) of science has on modern consciousness and, in turn, many of the most important issues confronting American society in an era of global warming, wars on science, and other inconvenient truths. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: DAVID TIETGE is Associate Professor of English at Monmouth University, where he teaches courses in rhetorical theory, the rhetoric of science, composition pedagogy, literature, and writing. He has published on scientific rhetoric in THE JOURNAL OF TECHNICAL WRITING AND COMMUNICATION and JAC. His earlier book, FLASH EFFECT: SCIENCE AND THE RHETORICAL ORIGINS OF COLD WAR AMERICA (2002, Ohio University Press), examines the role of science on the ideology of American society during the early Cold War era.

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Contents

A Case For Rhetorical Studies
3
A Culture of Science and Capitalism
20
The Creation of MediaReady Science
75
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

David Tietge is Associate Professor of English at Monmouth University, where he teaches courses in rhetorical theory, the rhetoric of science, composition pedagogy, literature, and writing.

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