The Spirit of Laws, Volume 1

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Contents

I
v
II
xvii
III
3
V
10
VII
21
VIII
31
IX
42
XI
73
XXII
185
XXIV
209
XXV
223
XXVII
237
XXIX
253
XXXI
266
XXXIII
273
XXXV
294

XIII
96
XV
111
XVII
128
XIX
135
XX
151

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Page 157 - The latter we shall call the judiciary power, and the other simply the executive power of the state. The political liberty of the subject is a tranquillity of mind , arising from the opinion each person has of his safety. In \ order to have this liberty, it is requisite the government be so
Page 203 - or thy son, or thy daughter, or the wife of thy bosom, or thy friend, which is as thine own soul, entice thee secretly, saying, ' Let us go and serve other gods,' thou shalt surely kill him, thou shalt stone him.
Page 4 - the relations of the quantity of matter and velocity; each diversity is uniformity, each change is constancy. (Particular intelligent beings may have laws of their own making, but they have some likewise which they never made. Before there were intelligent beings, they were possible; they had therefore possible relations, and consequently possible
Page 324 - Peace is the natural effect of trade. Two nations who traffic with each other become reciprocally dependent; for if one has an interest in buying, the other has an interest in selling; and thus their union is founded on their mutual necessities. But if the spirit of commerce unites nations, it does not in
Page 111 - with that of its principles. 2.—Of the Corruption of the Principles of Democracy. The principle of democracy is corrupted not only when the spirit of equality is extinct, but likewise when they fall into a spirit of extreme equality, and when each citizen would fain \ be upon a level with those whom he has chosen to command
Page 5 - imperfect knowledge he loses; and as a sensible creature, he is hurried away by a thousand impetuous passions. Such a being might every instant forget his Creator; God has therefore reminded him of his duty by the laws of religion. Such a being is liable every moment to forget himself; philosophy has provided against this by the laws of morality,
Page 167 - we find it is from that nation the English have borrowed the idea of their political government. This beautiful system was invented first in the woods. As all human things have an end, the state we are speaking
Page 43 - sole desire, to the sole happiness, of doing greater services to/ our country than the rest of our fellow-citizens. They cannot^ all render her equal services, but they all ought to serve her with equal alacrity. At our coming into the world, we contract an immense debt to our country, which we can never
Page 21 - I shall draw many consequences; of laws. 3.—Of the Principle of Democracy There is no great share of probity necessary to support a monarchical or despotic government. The force of laws in one, and the prince's arm in the other, are sufficient to direct and maintain the whole. But in a popular state, one spring more is necessary, namely, virtue.
Page 21 - Difference between the Nature and Principle of Government HAVING examined the laws in relation to the nature of each government, we must investigate those which relate to its principle. There is this difference between the nature and principle*" of government, that the former is that by which it is constituted, the

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