Political Movements and Violence in Central America

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 21, 2005 - History - 380 pages
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This book offers an indepth analysis of the confrontation between popular movements and repressive regimes in Central America for the three decades beginning in 1960, particularly in El Salvador and Guatemala. It examines both urban and rural groups as well as both nonviolent social movements and revolutionary movements. It studies the impact of state violence on contentious political movements as well as defends the political process model for studying such movements.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Front Grievances to Contentious Movements
37
THE EMERGENCE OF URBAN CONTENTIOUS
97
CONTENTIOUS PEASANTS AND THE PROBLEM
130
CYCLES OF CONTENTION
169
CHANGING POLITICAL OPPORTUNITIES
194
CHANGING POLITICAL OPPORTUNITIES
230
GUATEMALA
265
EL SALVADOR
292
CONCLUSION
324
Index
363
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About the author (2005)

Charles D. Brockett received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of North Carolina in 1974. He is the author of Land, Power, and Poverty: Agrarian Transformation and Political Conflict in Central America, which was selected as a Choice 'Outstanding Academic Book' of 1988. He is also the author of numerous articles published in scholarly journals and edited volumes, including the American Political Science Review and Latin American Research Review. In recognition of his work, he has received Fulbright awards for participation in the South America Today program in 1995 and for lecturing/research in Guatemala in 2000, the John B. Stephenson Fellowship from the Appalachian College Association, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend.

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