To the Ends of the Earth: The Last Journey of Lewis & Clark

Front Cover
Blind Rabbit Press, 2006 - Fiction - 386 pages
3 Reviews
Brilliant but troubled, Meriwether Lewis never found his footing after returning home from the West in triumph. It is with some reluctance that the young discoverer accepted the job as Governor of the sprawling new Louisiana Territory he had just explored. Within a year of arriving in St. Louis, the remote frontier town that served as capital of the West, Lewis's life had entered a downhill slide. He became convinced that he would soon be dismissed in disgrace by the corrupt politicians in Washington he had sworn to serve, and vowed to travel to Washington to set the record straight. The next weeks of Meriwether Lewis's life can fairly be called one of the great unsolved mysteries of American history. All anyone really knows is that on October 11, 1809, Meriwether Lewis was found shot dead in a remote inn on the Natchez Trace in Tennessee, a road through the wilderness so dangerous it was called "The Devil's Backbone." Was it suicide? Or murder? To this day, historians cannot agree. No inquest was ever held into Lewis's death; no investigation was ever undertaken. Based on extensive historical research, To the Ends of the Earth reconstructs Lewis's last days and brings alive the atmosphere of intrigue and danger that characterized the early American West. Then, in a powerful reimagining of the tale, it is given to brave William Clark, Lewis's best friend and partner in discovery, the role of discovering the truth. Clark's relationships with Lewis, his teenage wife Julia, and his African-American slave York form much of the emotional core of the novel. Readers will join Lewis and Clark on the final voyage of their legendary friendship in a story of honor, vengeance, and, ultimately, redemption.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - narwhaltortellini - LibraryThing

Why I read it: I've always had a bit of fondness for Lewis and Clark, being two people in history who accomplished something by working equally and happily together rather than, say, killing or one ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dsalerni - LibraryThing

Three years after the famous Expedition of Lewis and Clark, Meriwether Lewis lost his life under mysterious circumstances in the middle of the Tennessee wilderness. Suicide, murder, or accident – the ... Read full review

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Frances Hunter lives in Austin, Texas. This is her first novel. To learn more about Frances Hunter, visit www.frances-hunter.com.

Bibliographic information