Neurosis and Human Growth: The Struggle Toward Self-realization

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Routledge, 1999 - Psychology - 391 pages
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In Neurosis and Human Growth, Dr. Horney discusses the neurotic process as a special form of the human development, the antithesis of healthy growth. She unfolds the different stages of this situation, describing neurotic claims, the tyranny or inner dictates and the neurotic's solutions for relieving the tensions of conflict in such emotional attitudes as domination, self-effacement, dependency, or resignation. Throughout, she outlines with penetrating insight the forces that work for and against the person's realization of his or her potentialities.

First Published in 1950. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

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User Review  - wildbill - LibraryThing

The author was born in 1885 and trained as a psychiatrist and psycho-analyst. She had fundamental disagreements with Freud and is known as a Neo-Freudian. This book was written in 1950 and is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wildbill - LibraryThing

The author was born in 1885 and trained as a psychiatrist and psycho-analyst. She had fundamental disagreements with Freud and is known as a Neo-Freudian. This book was written in 1950 and is ... Read full review

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About the author (1999)

Karen Danielsen Horney was a German-born American psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. Educated at the universities of Freiburg, Gottingen, and Berlin, she practiced in Europe until 1932, when she moved to the United States. Initially, she taught at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, but with others broke away in 1941 to found the American Institute for Psychoanalysis. Horney took issue with several orthodox Freudian teachings, including the Oedipus complex, the death instinct, and the inferiority of women. She thought that classical psychoanalytic theory overemphasized the biological sources of neuroses. Her own theory of personality stressed the sociological determinants of behavior and viewed the individual as capable of fundamental growth and change.

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