Elie Wiesel and the Art of Storytelling

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Rosemary Horowitz
McFarland, May 26, 2017 - Literary Criticism - 242 pages
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Elie Wiesel is a master storyteller with the ability to use storytelling as a form of activism. From his landmark memoir Night to his novels and numerous retellings of Hasidic legends, Wiesel’s literature emphasizes storytelling, and he frequently refers to himself as a storyteller rather than an author or historian. In this work, essays examine Wiesel’s roots in Jewish storytelling traditions; influences from religious, folk, and secular sources; education; Yiddish background; Holocaust experience; and writing style. Emphasized throughout is Wiesel’s use of multiple sources in an effort to reach diverse audiences.
 

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Contents

Wiesel American Autobiographies and the Shaping of a Storied Subject
15
Creative Ambiguity in Wiesels Storytelling
38
Telling Stories of Children and Loss
57
The Storyteller and His Quarrel with God
71
Wiesels Autobiographical Storytelling as Midrash
90
Jewish Contexts for Wiesels Storytelling
102
Wiesels The Gates of the Forest
123
Transfiguration
156
The Artist as Witness Prophet and Encourager
182
Wiesel as Storyteller of His People
197
Examining and Acting On the Moral Aspects of Night
212
Nightthe Memoira Promise Fulfilled
226
About the Contributors
231
Index
235
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Page 3 - His gift is the ability to relate his life; his distinction, to be able to tell his entire life. The storyteller: he is the man who could let the wick of his life be consumed completely by the gentle flame of his story.

About the author (2017)

Rosemary Horowitz is a professor of English at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. She has published extensively on yizker books.

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