A hand catalogue of postage stamps

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1862
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Page vii - Hence a collection of postage-stamps may be considered, like a collection of coins, an epitome of the history of Europe and America for the last quarter of a century ; and at the same time, as they exhibit much variation in design and in execution, as a collection of works of art on a small scale, showing the style of art of the countries that issue them, while the size of the collection, and the number in which they are arranged and kept, will show the industry, taste, and neatness of the collector.
Page vii - The use and charm of collecting any kind of object is to educate the mind and the eye to careful observation, accurate comparison, and just reasoning on the differences and likenesses which they present ; and to interest the collector in the design or art shown in their creation or manufacture, and the history of the country which produces or uses the objects collected.
Page vii - ... collector in the design or art shown in their creation or manufacture, and the history of the country which produces or uses the objects collected. The postage stamps afford good objects for all these branches of study, as they are sufficiently different to present broad outlines for their classification ; and yet some of the variations are so slight that they require minute examination and comparison to prevent them from being overlooked ; and the fact of obtaining stamps from so many countries...
Page viii - Stamps, — having satisfied my own mind that the great cost of the Post-Office was not the reception, carriage, and delivery of the letters, but the complicated system of accounts that the old system required, and having learned from the best writers on political economy that the collection of money by stamps was the most certain and economical.
Page xii - The envt lope should be addressed before the letter is put in it. Notice carefully the arrangement, position and punctuation of the sample envelope addresses given in Models 14 to 18. MISCELLANEOUS HINTS. 133.— Position of Stamp. - The stamp should be placed on the upper right-hand corner of the envelope, about one-eighth of an inch from the end, and half as far from the upper edge ; it should be right side up, with the edges parallel with the edges of the envelope. Placing the stamp on the envelope...
Page viii - ... that the great cost of the Post Office was not the reception, carriage, and delivery of the letters, but the complicated system of accounts that the old system required; and having learned from the best writers on political economy that the collection of money by stamps was the most certain and economical. It was, in fact, the mere application of the system used with regard to newspapers to letters in general.
Page xv - Manuel du collectionneur de timbres-poste, ou Nomenclature générale de tous les timbres adoptés dans les divers pays de l'univers; par JB Moens.
Page vii - ... this country, or to a single class ; for collections are frequently to be seen in the drawing-room of the luxurious, in the study of the enlightened, and the locker of the schoolboy. The fashion has been ridiculed, as all fashions will be ; but if postage stamps are properly studied, collected, and arranged, there is no reason why they may not be quite as instructive and entertaining as the collection of birds, butterflies, shells, books, engravings, coins, or other objects.
Page xv - Aids to Stamp Collectors ; being a List of English and Foreign Postage Stamps in Circulation since 1840. By a Stamp Collector.
Page vii - ... many changes in the form or design of the stamp used, while other countries, like Holland, have never made the slightest change. The changes referred to all mark some historical event of importance ; such as the accession of a new king, a change in the form of government, or the absorption of a smaller state into some larger one, a change in the currency, or some other revolution. Hence a collection of postage stamps...

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