The History of Modern Serbia

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W. Tweedie, 1872 - Serbia - 272 pages
 

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Page 21 - Dahis (viz., the Moslem military aristocracy) should leave Servia, and the government be conducted by a pasha nominated directly by the sultan; that all the new imposts hitherto levied by the Dahis should be abolished, and only such taxes be paid hereafter as were fixed by the sultan's firman of 1793 ; that courts of justice should be established in all cantons ; that the municipalities should choose their own mayors, who should thereupon be confirmed by the Belgrade vizier ; that the Servians should...
Page 218 - God, who detests the idea of his subjects having any share of the government, a book in which is openly taught that the divine right of magistrates does not exist; that the prince is for the sake of the people, not the people for the sake of the prince, and that, therefore, the prince must have the weal of his people at heart exclusively, and not his private interests; that the power entrusted to princes exclusively in the interest of the subjects, may, for that reason, if their interest demands...
Page 21 - ... for provisions, their progress would be slow. This civil war, once begun, soon wrapped the country in a blaze; and what were the Servians, after all, fighting for ? Their demands were officially formulated as follows : — That the Dahis (viz., the Moslem military aristocracy) should leave Servia, and the government be conducted by a pasha nominated directly by the sultan; that all the new imposts hitherto levied by the Dahis should be abolished, and only such taxes be paid hereafter as were...
Page 64 - ... it the Servians were mentioned as follows : — 'Though there is no doubt of the benevolent and magnanimous dispositions of the Sublime Porte with respect to Servia, a nation from old time subject to Turkey, and paying tribute to her, yet taking into consideration the participation of the Servians in the last war, it has been found needful to lay down special conditions for their security. Consequently the Sublime Porte will pledge itself to pardon the Servians and give them a general amnesty...
Page 5 - ... voyvode Milosh Obilitch.1 The Passing of Serbia From that day Serbia ceased virtually to be an independent kingdom. For another fifty years she nominally retained her rulers, while her centre of gravity shifted northward, the capital being moved first to Krushevats, and later to Smederevo (Semendria), but the true instinct of the people led them to mourn over the
Page 2 - ... resources and in particular the silver mines, which soon proved one of the chief sources of wealth. A brisk general trade was done with Ragusa and especially with Venice, whose monetary system Serbia had adopted. It follows that as early as the thirteenth century the chief political task of the Serbians was to secure a firm footing on the coast of the Adriatic. The usual title of the old Serbian monarchs was, " By the grace of God King of all Serbian lands and to the sea-coast.
Page 64 - ... daring but more astute Obrenovics, so that the foundations of a dynastic civil war were laid, as each hero commanded an immense following. At the conclusion of the war between Russia and Turkey, the Treaty of Bucharest was signed in May, 1812, and in it the Servians were mentioned as follows : — 'Though there is no doubt of the benevolent and magnanimous dispositions of the Sublime Porte with respect to Servia, a nation from old time subject to Turkey, and paying tribute to her, yet taking...
Page 37 - Rodophinikin was appointed agent in Belgrade, with instructions to assure the Serbians that the Tsar would use all occasions to help them " when once he had proofs of their willingness to conform in all things to the initiative of the Russian Government.
Page 23 - ... affair was entrusted by the Porte to Bekir Pasha, who now arrived with three thousand men, and halted on the left bank of the Kolubara, Karageorge being on the opposite side with a force twice as large. A cautious exchange of compliments took place ; Karageorge declared the willingness of the Serbians to remain loyal subjects of the Sultan, but at the same time their determination not to be governed any longer by the Janissaries ; Bekir Pasha made a fair answer, but was amazed and highly displeased...
Page vi - Serbia is the single European State that has not yet the blessing, or burden, of national debt.

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