Notes on the Chinese Documentary Style

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Kelly & Walsh, limited, 1888 - Chinese language - 150 pages
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Page 11 - A Chinese character may in general be considered as conveying an idea without reference to any part of speech: and its being used as a substantive, an adjective, or a verb depends on circumstances.
Page 4 - ... term that the Chinese apply almost exclusively to the compositions of the candidates at examinations, and others of a similar nature. The business style differs from the wan ch'ang in another material point. In the latter, an appropriate and well understood term, which does not suit the rhythmus, is exchanged for one less suitable in sense and not so well defined, but which sounds better ; in the business style, on the other hand, little or no attention is paid to the rhythmus or sound, but distinctness...
Page 15 - ... but chiefly because I look at them as a sort of philosophical necessity, the principles of thought peculiar to the human mind rather than to any particular language. Speaking, therefore, of the Verb Passive, for instance, I do not mean to show how the "Passive" is formed in Chinese, but simply answer the question : what are the means at the disposal of the language for expressing that change taking place with an active verb which in Western language is expressed by giving it the passive form...
Page 5 - ... in the business style, on the other hand, little or no attention is paid to the rhythmus or sound, but distinctness being the chief object in view, a word or term is repeated again and again, whenever its omission would appear likely to cause ambiguity. From the spoken language the business style, like every other written style, differs very widely. As a vast number of the Chinese words which are written quite differently are pronounced exactly alike, they are obliged in speaking to join others...
Page 13 - ... done, now doing, or intended to be done ; they must also be described as done absolutely or conditionally, as proper to be done, or peremptorily commanded. Further the various circumstances of the doer, and of the subject of the action, must also be either plainly expressed or tacitly understood ; hence the need of prepositions connecting words, too, necessarily exist in every language, as well as those which express the emotions of the mind. Thus the principles of grammar must substantially...
Page 94 - Then Akawi-ko replied, saying: "Having in such and such a month " of such and such a year received the Heavenly Sovereign's " commands, I have been reverently awaiting the great com" mand until this day, and eighty years have past by.
Page 24 - ... permission'to return to their homes ; the authorities, civil or military, of their own districts, will not be allowed to make (their past absence "— this is Mr. Wade's addition — ) "a pretext for extorting from them the money or goods they may bring with them...
Page 13 - MAKSHMAN is, therefore, right in making the following observation : " The language of every country must possess words which denote things and others which signify qualities. It must have words to express actions done ; and these as done by one or many ; already done, now doing, or intended to be done ; they must also be described as done absolutely or conditionally, as proper to be done, or peremptorily commanded.
Page 8 - The familiar style is the least terse of any of the Chinese written styles ; it contains very few of the empty particles, it does not confine itself by any attention to the rhythmus, and contains a considerable admixture of terms used in the spoken language. "The narrative parts of novels form examples of this style, which the Chinese designate as plain but shallow. "The colloquial Chinese...

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