Agnes Grey

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J. Grant, 1905 - England - 301 pages
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User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

In the midst of the Wars of the Roses, a young man discovers that his guardian had a hand in his father's death. Presumably, he swears vengeance and joins the resistance hiding in the forest. This is ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

To this day, I have not been able to read the last third of this book. I know what happens in the end, but I just can't make myself read it. The sensitive way Wharton wrote Lily Bart and Arthur, the ... Read full review

Contents

I
15
II
33
III
44
IV
61
V
75
VI
85
VII
94
VIII
117
XV
177
XVI
197
XVII
208
XVIII
214
XIX
230
XX
244
XXI
249
XXII
258

IX
122
X
129
XI
137
XII
159
XIII
166
XXIII
267
XXIV
279
XXV
285
XXVI
294

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Page 5 - it is scarcely known, and all of it that merits to be known are the poems of Ellis Bell. The fixed conviction I held, and hold, of the worth of these poems has not indeed received the confirmation of much favourable criticism ; but I must retain it notwithstanding.
Page 11 - Christian doctrines in which she firmly believed, that she found support through her most painful journey. I witnessed their efficacy in her latest hour and greatest trial, and must bear my testimony to the calm triumph -with which they brought her through. She died May
Page 40 - permitted to depart, but first, with great pomp, he plucked a polyanthus and presented it to me, as one conferring a prodigious favour. I observed, on the grass about his garden, certain apparatus of sticks and cord, and asked what they were. "Traps for birds." " Why do you catch them ? " " Papa says they do harm.
Page iv - IT has been thought that all the works published under the names of Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell, were, in reality, the production of one person. This mistake I endeavoured to rectify by a few words of disclaimer prefixed to the third edition of "Jane Eyre." These, too, it appears, failed to gain
Page 34 - among its strange inhabitants. But how was it to be done ? True, I was near nineteen, but, thanks to my retired life and the protecting care of my mother and sister, I well knew that many a girl of fifteen, or under, was gifted with a more womanly address, and greater ease and self-possession, than
Page 277 - shadow of the distant hills, or of the earth itself; and, in sympathy for the busy citizens of the rookery, I regretted to see their habitation, so lately bathed in glorious light, reduced to the sombre, work-aday hue of the lower world, or of my own world within. For a moment, such birds as
Page 214 - CHAPTER XVII. CONFESSIONS. As I am in the way of confessions, I may as well acknowledge that, about this time, I paid more attention to dress than ever I had done before. This is not saying much; for hitherto I had been a little neglectful in that particular: but now, also, it
Page 147 - Oh, she's a canting old fool.' "And I was very ill grieved, Miss Grey ! But I went to my seat, and I tried to do my duty as aforetime : but I like got no peace. An' I even took the sacrament; but I felt as though I were eating and drinking
Page 73 - got my supper, in spite of you : and I haven't picked up a single thing !" The only person in the house who had any real sympathy for me was the nurse; for she had suffered like afflictions, though in a smaller degree ; as she had not the task of teaching, nor was she
Page 206 - Fix that man." " What in the world do you mean ? " " I mean that he will go home and dream of me. I have shot him through the heart! " " How do you know ? " "By many infallible proofs: more especially the look he gave me when he went away. It was not an impudent look—I

About the author (1905)

Anne Bronte was the daughter of an impoverished clergyman of Haworth in Yorkshire, England. Considered by many critics as the least talented of the Bronte sisters, Anne wrote two novels. Agnes Grey (1847) is the story of a governess, and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (1848), is a tale of the evils of drink and profligacy. Her acquaintance with the sin and wickedness shown in her novels was so astounding that Charlotte Bronte saw fit to explain in a preface that the source of her sister's knowledge of evil was their brother Branwell's dissolute ways. A habitue of drink and drugs, he finally became an addict. Anne Bronte's other notable work is her Complete Poems. Anne Bronte died in 1849.

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