Queen Elizabeth

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1899 - 307 pages
 

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Page 277 - ... next came the Queen, in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic ; her face oblong, fair but wrinkled ; • her eyes small, yet black and pleasant, her nose a little hooked ; her lips narrow, and her teeth black (a defect the English seem subject to, from their too great use of sugar...
Page 231 - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 278 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk, shot with silver threads ; her train was very long, the end of it borne by a marchioness ; instead of a chain she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels.
Page 261 - Wherefore, Mr. Speaker, her majesty's pleasure is, that if you perceive any idle heads, which will not stick to hazard their own estates; which will meddle with reforming the Church, and transforming the commonwealth ; and do exhibit any bills to such purpose, that you receive them not, until they be viewed and considered by those who it is fitter should consider of such things, and can better judge of them.
Page 33 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it ; And what the word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Page 230 - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear. I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and goodwill of my subjects...
Page 277 - First went gentlemen, barons, earls, knights of the garter, all richly dressed and bare-headed : next came the chancellor, bearing the seals in a red silk purse between two ; one of which carried the royal sceptre, the other the sword of state, in a red scabbard, studded with golden fleurs-de-lis, the point upwards...
Page 291 - And though God hath raised me high, yet this I count the glory of my crown, that I have reigned with your loves. This makes me that I do not so much rejoice, that God hath made me to be a Queen, as to be a Queen over so thankful a people.
Page 244 - I that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks, like a nymph; sometime sitting in the shade like a Goddess; sometime singing like an angel; sometime playing like Orpheus. Behold the sorrow of this world! Once amiss, hath bereaved me of all.
Page 299 - After he had continued long in prayer, till the old man's knees were weary, he blessed her, and meant to rise and leave her. The Queen made a sign with her hand. My sister Scroope, knowing her meaning, told the Bishop the Queen desired he would pray still. He did so for a long half-hour after, and then thought to leave her.

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