The Diamond Age

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Aug 26, 2003 - Fiction - 512 pages
1547 Reviews
Decades into our future, a stone's throw from the ancient city of Shanghai, a brilliant nanotechnologist named John Percival Hackworth has just broken the
rigorous moral code of his tribe, the powerful neoVictorians.  He's made an illicit copy of a state-of-the-art interactive device called A Young Ladys Illustrated Primer  Commissioned by an eccentric duke for his grandchild, stolen for Hackworth's own daughter, the Primer's purpose is to educate and raise a girl capable of thinking for herself.  It performs its function superbly.  Unfortunately for Hackworth, his smuggled copy has fallen into the wrong hands.

Young Nell and her brother Harv are thetes--members of the poor, tribeless class.  Neglected by their mother, Harv looks after Nell.  When he and his gang waylay a certain neo-Victorian--John Percival Hackworth--  in the seamy streets of their neighborhood, Harv brings Nell something special: the Primer.


Following the discovery of his crime, Hackworth begins an odyssey of his own.  Expelled from the neo-Victorian paradise, squeezed by agents of Protocol
Enforcement on one side and a Mandarin underworld crime lord on the other, he searches for an elusive figure known as the Alchemist.  His quest and Nell's
will ultimately lead them to another seeker whose fate is bound up with the Primer-- a woman who holds the key to a vast, subversive information
network that is destined to decode and reprogram the future of humanity.

Vividly imagined, stunningly prophetic, and epic in scope, The Diamond Age is a major novel from one of the most visionary writers of our time


From the Paperback edition.
 

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Review: The Diamond Age: or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer

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Fantastic story, incredible ideas around social structure and engineering, all linked by a writer who is a computer scientist to boot, excelent Read full review

Review: The Diamond Age: or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer

User Review  - Goodreads

I'm still confused by this book. The end finally introduced some action but that only added to my confusion. Is it an allegory? Seriously, I like the author and have read nearly every other book by him. Just never understood or enjoyed this one. Glad to be past it. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
7
Section 4
12
Section 5
25
Section 6
38
Section 7
47
Section 8
53
Section 18
253
Section 19
255
Section 20
274
Section 21
286
Section 22
295
Section 23
306
Section 24
311
Section 25
326

Section 9
72
Section 10
97
Section 11
106
Section 12
109
Section 13
111
Section 14
116
Section 15
161
Section 16
211
Section 17
238
Section 26
357
Section 27
404
Section 28
408
Section 29
435
Section 30
448
Section 31
488
Section 32
501
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Neal Stephenson, the science fiction author, was born on October 31, 1959 in Maryland. He graduated from Boston University in 1981 with a B.A. in Geography with a minor in physics. His first novel, The Big U, was published in 1984. It received little attention and stayed out of print until Stephenson allowed it to be reprinted in 2001. His second novel was Zodiac: The Eco-Thriller was published in 1988, but it was his novel Snow Crash (1992) that brought him popularity. It fused memetics, computer viruses, and other high-tech themes with Sumerian mythology. Neal Stephenson has won several awards: Hugo for Best Novel for The Diamond Age (1996), the Arthur C. Clark for Best Novel for Quicksilver (2004), and the Prometheus Award for Best Novel for The System of the World (2005). He recently completed the The Baroque Cycle Trilogy, a series of historical novels. It consists of eight books and was originally published in three volumes and Reamde. He currently resides in Seattle, Washington. Stephenson also writes under the pseudonym Stephen Bury.

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