Annual Register, Volume 14

Front Cover
Edmund Burke
1772 - History
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Page 245 - ON Leven's banks, while free to rove, And tune the rural pipe to love, I envied not the happiest swain That ever trod the Arcadian plain. Pure stream, in whose transparent wave My youthful limbs I wont to lave ; No torrents stain thy limpid source, No rocks impede thy dimpling course, That sweetly warbles o'er its bed, With white round...
Page 169 - Nature ; they will suggest many observations which would probably escape you, if your study were confined to Nature alone. And, indeed, I cannot help suspecting that in this instance the ancients had an easier task than the Moderns. They had, probably, little or nothing to unlearn, as their manners were nearly approaching to this desirable simplicity, while the modern Artist, before he can see the truth of things, is obliged to remove a veil with which the fashion of the times has thought proper...
Page 224 - With merriment, and song, and timbrels clear, A troop of dames from myrtle bowers advance ; The little warriors doff the targe and spear, And loud enlivening strains provoke the dance. They meet, they dart away, they wheel askance ; To right, to left, they thrid the flying maze ; Now bound aloft with vigorous spring, then glance Rapid along : with many-colour'd rays Of tapers, gems, and gold, the echoing forests blaze.
Page 246 - While, lightly poised, the scaly brood In myriads cleave thy crystal flood; The springing trout in speckled pride, The salmon, monarch of the tide; The ruthless pike, intent on war, The silver eel, and mottled par. Devolving from thy parent lake, A charming maze thy waters make, By bowers of birch and groves of pine, And hedges flower'd with eglantine.
Page 167 - ... superior to any individual form of that class; yet the highest perfection of the human figure is not to be found in any one of them. It is not in the Hercules...
Page 52 - The highlanders were compofed of a number of tribes called clans, each of which bore a different name, and lived upon the lands of a different chieftain. The members of every tribe were tied one to another, not only by the feudal but by the; patriarchal bond : for while the individuals which...
Page 166 - This idea of the perfect state of nature, which the Artist calls the Ideal Beauty, is the great leading principle by which works of genius are conducted. By this Phidias acquired his fame. He wrought upon a sober principle what has so much excited the enthusiasm of the world ; and by this method you, who have courage to tread the same path, may acquire equal reputation.
Page 236 - ¡rinds, tenements, hereditaments, penfions, offices, and perfonal eftates, in that part of Great - Britain, called England, Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed ; and that a proportionable cefs, according to the ninth article of the treaty of union, be laid upon that part of Great-Britain called Scotland, 1,500,000!.
Page 191 - We have thought fit, by and with the Advice of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal Proclamation, hereby...
Page 166 - This great ideal perfection and beauty are not to be sought in the heavens but upon the earth. They are about us, and upon every side of us. But the power of discovering what is deformed in Nature, or in other words what is particular and uncommon, can be acquired only by experience ; and the whole beauty and grandeur of the Art consists, in my opinion, in being able to get above all singular forms, local customs, particularities, and details of every kind.

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