Linnaeus' Philosophia Botanica

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Jun 2, 2005 - Nature - 402 pages
Philosophia Botanica (The Science of Botany), by Carl Linnaeus, was originally published in Latin in Stockholm and Amsterdam in 1751. It is a greatly expanded revision of his Fundamenta Botanica (Foundations of Botany) of 1736, summarizing his work on the classification and taxonomy of plants while adding substantial new material. The book represents a critical stage in the evolution of binomial nomenclature, with a single word to describe the genus and another for the species. Special importance is attached to accurate description of the parts of plants, and to the correct use of technical terms. There are also explanations of the effects of soil and climatic conditions on plant growth. The book includes 10 original engravings, with 167 figures showing the shapes of leaves and other parts of the plant, and 6 short memoranda describing Linnaeus' botanical excursions, detailing his ideas for garden and herbarium construction, and outlining what is required of a botanist and his pupils. There are also indexes of technical terms, genera, and subjects. The first full English translation of this classic work since 1775, this beautiful book will be highly attractive to botanists and all those interested in the history of science.
 

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Contents

I The library
13
II Systems
31
III Plants
51
IV The fruitbody
65
V Sex
99
VI Characters
111
VII Names
169
VIII Definitions
219
XI Sketches
277
XII Potencies
299
The Linnaean classes and orders
351
The natural orders
353
Abbreviations of names of botanists and other authorities
357
Selective list of Linnaeus works up to 1753
360
Selective list of other botanical works
362
Principal sources used for this edition
364

IX Varieties
257
X Synonyms
269

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Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Stephen Freer is a fellow of the Linnean Society of London.

Bibliographic information