Adam Bede

Front Cover
Penguin, 1980 - Fiction - 607 pages
5 Reviews
The English Midlands at the turn of the eighteenth century is the setting for George Eliot's moving novels of three unworldly people trapped by unwise love. Adam Bede, a simple carpenter, loves too blindly; Hetty Sorrel, a coquettish beauty, loves too recklessly; and Arthur Donnithorn, a dashing squire, loves too carelessly. Betrayed by their innocence, vanity, and imprudence, their foolish hearts lead them to a tragic triangle of seduction, murder, and retribution. With emotional sincerity and intellectual integrity, George Eliot probes deeply into the psychology of commonplace people caught in the act of uncommon heroics. Alexander Dumas called this novel "the masterpiece of the century."
 

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Review: Adam Bede

User Review  - Gloriavirtutisumbra - Goodreads

Another book from that dreadful class. Have i ever mentioned how much i loathe george eliot's stories? I am filled with homicidal rage at her characters throughout 98% of the time spent dragging ... Read full review

Review: Adam Bede

User Review  - Lily Bart - Goodreads

"Don't hate me because I'm beautiful!" HETTY SORREL Read full review

Contents

ADAM BEDE
1
The Workshop
7
The Preaching
16
After the Preaching
35
Home and its Sorrows
41
The Rector
56
The Hall Farm
72
The Dairy
84
The Delivery of the Letter
320
In Hettys BedChamber
332
Mrs Poyser Has Her Say Out
341
More Links
350
The Betrothal
357
The Hidden Dread
362
BOOK FIFTH
369
The Journey in Hope
371

A Vocation
89
Hettys World
97
Dinah Visits Lisbeth
104
In the Cottage
115
In the Wood
123
Evening in the Wood
134
The Return Home
139
The Two BedChambers
148
Links
161
BOOK SECOND
175
In Which the Story Pauses a Little
177
Church
186
Adam on a Working Day
208
Adam Visits the Hall Farm
215
The NightSchool and the Schoolmaster
232
BOOK THIRD
247
Going to the Birthday Feast
249
DinnerTime
259
The HealthDrinking
264
The Games
272
The Dance
280
BOOK FOURTH
291
A Crisis
293
A Dilemma
304
The Next Morning
312
The Journey in Despair
380
The Quest
392
The Tidings
406
The Bitter Waters Spread
413
The Eve of the Trial
422
The Morning of the Trial
427
The Verdict
432
Arthurs Return
439
In the Prison
446
The Hours of Suspense
456
The Last Moment
462
Another Meeting in the Wood
464
BOOK SIXTH
473
At the Hall Farm
475
In the Cottage
484
Sunday Morning
495
Adam and Dinah
507
The Harvest Supper
515
The Meeting on the Hill
528
Marriage Bells
533
Epilogue
536
George Eliots History of Adam Bede
540
The Germ of Adam Bede Hettys Story
544
Notes
548
Copyright

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Page xvii - require a sympathy ready-made, a moral sentiment already in activity; but a picture of human life such as a great artist can give, surprises even the trivial and the selfish into that attention to what is apart from themselves, which may be called the raw material of moral sentiment ... Art is the nearest thing
Page xvii - life; it is a mode of amplifying experience and extending our contact with our fellow-men beyond the bounds of our personal lot. All the more sacred is the task of the artist when he undertakes to paint the life of the People. It is
Page xvi - our social novels profess to represent the people as they are, and the unreality of their representations is a grave evil. The greatest benefit we owe to the artist, whether painter, poet, or novelist, is the extension of our sympathies. Appeals founded on generalizations and

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About the author (1980)

Mary Ann (Marian) Evans was born in 1819 in Warwickshire. She attended schools in Nuneaton and Coventry, coming under the influence of evangelical teachers and clergymen. In 1836 her mother died and Marian became her father's housekeeper, educating herself in her spare time. In 1841 she moved to Coventry, and met Charles and Caroline Bray, local progressive intellectuals. Through them she was commissioned to translate Strauss's Life of Jesus and met the radical publisher John Chapman, who, when he purchased the Westminster Review in 1851, made her his managing editor.

Having lost her Christian faith and thereby alienated her family, she moved to London and met Herbert Spencer (whom she nearly married, only he found her too 'morbidly intellectual') and the versatile man-of-letters George Henry Lewes. Lewes was separated from his wife, but with no possibility of divorce. In 1854 he and Marian decided to live together, and did so until Lewes's death in 1878. It was he who encouraged her to turn from philosophy and journalism to fiction, and during those years, under the name of George Eliot, she wrote Scenes of Clerical Life, Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner, Romola, Felix Holt, Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda, as well as numerous essays, articles and reviews.

George Eliot died in 1880, on

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